Top Republican calls on Nadler to have Mueller testify

The top Republican on the House Judiciary Committee is urging the panel's Democratic chairman to have special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) MuellerCNN's Toobin warns McCabe is in 'perilous condition' with emboldened Trump CNN anchor rips Trump over Stone while evoking Clinton-Lynch tarmac meeting The Hill's 12:30 Report: New Hampshire fallout MORE testify about his findings from the 22-month investigation into Russian interference.

Rep. Doug CollinsDouglas (Doug) Allen CollinsWin by QAnon believer creates new headaches for House GOP Andrew Clyde wins Georgia GOP runoff to replace Doug Collins New poll shows tight presidential race in Georgia MORE (R-Ga.) in a letter on Monday called on Chairman Jerrold NadlerJerrold (Jerry) Lewis NadlerTop Democrats call for DOJ watchdog to probe Barr over possible 2020 election influence House passes bill to protect pregnant workers House Democrats postpone vote on marijuana decriminalization bill MORE (D-N.Y.) to seek Mueller's testimony, rather than going after Attorney General William BarrBill BarrBarr says Ginsburg 'leaves a towering legacy' Republicans call for DOJ to prosecute Netflix executives for releasing 'Cuties' Trump doesn't offer vote of confidence for FBI director MORE, arguing that this is the best path to obtaining transparency.

"If you seek both transparency and for the American public to learn the full contours of the Special Counsel’s investigation, public testimony from Special Counsel Mueller himself is undoubtedly the best way to accomplish this goal," Collins wrote to Nadler.

"To that end, Special Counsel Mueller should be invited to testify before the Committee during the week of April 22. Although the House is expected to be in recess that week, I think we can agree this business is too important to wait, and Members of the Committee will surely return to Washington at such a critical moment in our country’s history," Collins continued.

ADVERTISEMENT

The GOP lawmaker's letter comes after Democrats on the panel voted last week along party lines to authorize a subpoena for Mueller's investigative report as well as the underlying evidence used in the investigation.

While Nadler has said he will give Barr time to turn over the final, unredacted report to Congress before issuing the subpoena, he has not provided a timeline on the matter. Nadler also signaled to reporters last week that he is interested in having Mueller testify, but he indicated he wants to see the full report before making such decisions.

Barr concluded along with Deputy Attorney General Rod RosensteinRod RosensteinDOJ kept investigators from completing probe of Trump ties to Russia: report Five takeaways from final Senate Intel Russia report FBI officials hid copies of Russia probe documents fearing Trump interference: book MORE that there was not enough evidence to charge President TrumpDonald John TrumpObama calls on Senate not to fill Ginsburg's vacancy until after election Planned Parenthood: 'The fate of our rights' depends on Ginsburg replacement Progressive group to spend M in ad campaign on Supreme Court vacancy MORE with obstruction of justice, even after Mueller declined to make a judgment either way.

Barr's involvement has become a flashpoint among Democrats who say they must see the full report because the attorney general, a Trump appointee, may have sought to protect the president with such an interpretation. In recent weeks, Democrats have increasingly questioned Barr’s ability to be a neutral arbiter over the probe, while also using his involvement to fuel their arguments for access to the full report.

“The Constitution charges Congress with holding the president accountable for alleged official misconduct,” Nadler said at the outset of a meeting last week before lawmakers approved the subpoena. “That job requires us to evaluate the evidence for ourselves — not the attorney general’s summary, not a substantially redacted synopsis, but the full report and the underlying evidence.”

Republicans say Nadler should be focusing his attention on Mueller, not Barr, who was not involved in the sprawling 22-month investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election.

"Attorney General Barr was never a part of this investigation, and instead simply reviewed the Special Counsel’s final report and has provided Congress, so far, with the Special Counsel’s principal conclusions. While he can testify surrounding his decision to provide the Committee with principal conclusions, it is Special Counsel Mueller who is best-positioned to testify regarding the underlying facts and material in which you are so interested," Collins continues.

In his report, Mueller also found that there was not evidence of collusion or coordination between members of the Trump campaign or Russia.

Trump and his Republican allies have seized on Barr’s letter as exonerating the commander in chief.

They also say Nadler’s demands for Barr to release the entire report amount to asking the president's top law enforcement official to violate the law, with many pointing to federal rules that prohibit the public release of grand jury material unless there is a court order authorizing their release.

"You and your fellow Democrats created an untenable but politically convenient situation: force Attorney General William P. Barr to break the law to comply with your subpoena or label him as part of a cover-up if he does not," Collins said.