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Barr releases redacted Mueller report

Attorney General William BarrBill BarrNew DOJ rule could allow executions by electrocution, firing squad Clyburn: Biden falling short on naming Black figures to top posts Five federal inmates scheduled for execution before Inauguration Day MORE on Thursday released a redacted version of special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) MuellerCNN's Toobin warns McCabe is in 'perilous condition' with emboldened Trump CNN anchor rips Trump over Stone while evoking Clinton-Lynch tarmac meeting The Hill's 12:30 Report: New Hampshire fallout MORE’s report on his sprawling investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election.

The release of the report comes just over three weeks after Barr laid out what he described as Mueller’s core findings in a four-page letter that effectively cleared President TrumpDonald John TrumpGeraldo Rivera on Trump sowing election result doubts: 'Enough is enough now' Murkowski: Trump should concede White House race Scott Atlas resigns as coronavirus adviser to Trump MORE of allegations of criminal coordination between his campaign and Moscow, and just over an hour after Barr held a press conference reiterating there was no "collusion."

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The report is redacted to conceal grand jury material, classified information, details about ongoing investigations and information that could implicate the privacy of “peripheral” third parties.

The report’s public release also comes as lawmakers on Capitol Hill are out of Washington on a 2 1/2 week recess around the Easter holiday.

House Democrats have been clamoring for the release of Mueller’s full report — absent redactions — to Congress, threatening to subpoena it if Barr does not meet their demands. They have accused the attorney general of bias in his handling of Mueller’s final report, which was delivered confidentially to him on March 22.

Barr wrote a letter on March 24 revealing that the special counsel did not find sufficient evidence to charge members or associates of the Trump campaign with conspiring with the Russian government. Barr also said Mueller did not come to a conclusion on whether Trump obstructed justice, but that the attorney general added that he and his deputy, Rod RosensteinRod RosensteinTrump turns his ire toward Cabinet members Ex-deputy attorney general says Justice Dept. 'will ignore' Trump's threats against political rivals The Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by Facebook - Trump's erratic tweets upend stimulus talks; COVID-19 spreads in White House MORE, later reviewed the evidence and found it insufficient to accuse the president of an obstruction offense.

Mueller was appointed special counsel to investigation Russian interference and possible coordination between the Trump campaign and Moscow in May 2017, shortly after Trump fired James ComeyJames Brien ComeyCarter Page sues over surveillance related to Russia probe Top Republicans praise Trump's Flynn pardon The new marshmallow media in the Biden era MORE as FBI director.

In the course of his near two-year probe, Mueller indicted more than two dozen Russians for participating in two prongs of Moscow’s interference campaign: a plot to feed divisive content to Americans on social media ahead of the 2016 election and the theft and release of Democratic emails meant to damage the presidential nominee, Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonBiden budget pick sparks battle with GOP Senate Katko fends off Democratic opponent in New York race Harris County GOP chairman who made racist Facebook post resigns MORE.

Mueller’s probe also ensnared six Trump associates, a number of whom pleaded guilty to making false statements and other charges and agreed to cooperate in the investigation, including former national security adviser Michael Flynn and onetime Trump lawyer Michael CohenMichael Dean CohenPress: Trump's biggest fear is — lock him up Biden faces politically thorny decision on Trump prosecutions New York expands Trump tax fraud investigations to include write-offs: report MORE.

Mueller’s prosecutors secured a conviction against former Trump campaign chairman Paul ManafortPaul John ManafortFlynn spurs questions of who Trump might pardon next On The Money: Initial jobless claims rise for 2nd week | Dow dips below 30K | Mnuchin draws fire for COVID-19 relief move | Manhattan DA appeals dismissal of Manafort charges Manhattan DA appeals dismissal of Manafort charges to NY high court MORE, who was sentenced in March to a total of 7 1/2 years in prison for financial and other crimes linked to his foreign lobbying on behalf of pro-Russian forces in Ukraine.

Mueller’s investigation concluded with no recommendation of further indictments. However, several cases that spun off from the special counsel’s investigation are ongoing.