Blackwater founder Erik Prince helped fund effort tied to obtaining Clinton's emails

Blackwater founder Erik Prince helped fund effort tied to obtaining Clinton's emails
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Blackwater founder Erik Prince was involved in funding an effort to verify if a cache of stolen emails purporting to be from former Secretary of State Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonBiden: Probably '10 to 15 percent' of Americans 'are just not very good people' Mattis's Trump broadside underscores military tensions Mark Cuban says he's decided not to run for president MORE's private email server were legitimate, according to special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) MuellerCNN's Toobin warns McCabe is in 'perilous condition' with emboldened Trump CNN anchor rips Trump over Stone while evoking Clinton-Lynch tarmac meeting The Hill's 12:30 Report: New Hampshire fallout MORE's report.

Prince in 2016 was approached by Barbara Ledeen, an aide to Sen. Chuck GrassleyCharles (Chuck) Ernest GrassleyThe Hill's Morning Report - DC preps for massive Saturday protest; Murkowski breaks with Trump Murkowski, Mattis criticism ratchets up pressure on GOP over Trump CBO releases analysis on extending increased unemployment benefits MORE (R-Iowa), and agreed to fund the hiring of a tech expert to verify if the emails were from Clinton's server, which was the subject of a 2016 FBI investigation.

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"Ledeen claimed to have obtained a trove of emails (from what she described as the 'dark web') that purported to be the deleted Clinton emails. Ledeen wanted to authenticate the emails and solicited contributions to fund that effort. Erik Prince provided funding to hire a tech advisor to ascertain the authenticity of the emails," reads a section of the Mueller report, which was released Thursday.

"According to Prince, the tech advisor determined that the emails were not authentic," the report continues.

Prince, who advised the Trump campaign throughout 2016, admitted last month to have also been involved in a key meeting at Trump Tower during the campaign. At that meeting, businessman George Nader told top members of the campaign that the United Arab Emirates and Saudi Arabia were interested in supporting President TrumpDonald John TrumpTwitter CEO: 'Not true' that removing Trump campaign video was illegal, as president has claimed Biden formally clinches Democratic presidential nomination Barr says he didn't give 'tactical' command to clear Lafayette protesters MORE's bid for the White House.

Prince, the brother of Education Secretary Betsy DeVosElizabeth (Betsy) Dee DeVosGOP lawmaker wants probe of UPenn's Biden Center for Diplomacy and Global Engagement Taking the guesswork out of financial aid appeals Trump vetoes measure aimed at blocking DeVos student loan rule MORE, previously testified before Congress that he only had an "unofficial" role with the Trump campaign, limited to placing yard signs and attending fundraisers. But in March he told Al Jazeera he had discussed Iran policy with top members of the campaign.

Prince and Nader have both been asked to cooperate in the House Judiciary Committee's ongoing investigation into the president and his advisers.