Most Americans want to see Mueller, McGahn testify: poll

Most Americans want to see Mueller, McGahn testify: poll

Majorities of American adults say that both special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerMueller report fades from political conversation Trump calls for probe of Obama book deal Democrats express private disappointment with Mueller testimony MORE and former White House counsel Don McGahn should testify before Congress about the investigation into President TrumpDonald John TrumpDavid Axelrod after Ginsburg cancer treatment: Supreme Court vacancy could 'tear this country apart' EU says it will 'respond in kind' if US slaps tariffs on France Ginsburg again leaves Supreme Court with an uncertain future MORE's campaign and Russia, according to a new poll.

A Monmouth University survey released Wednesday found that 73 percent of U.S. adults think that Mueller should testify about his findings amid accusations from Democrats that Attorney General William BarrWilliam Pelham BarrFeds charge five in international ID theft ring targeting military members, veterans The road not taken: Another FBI failure involving the Clintons surfaces Correctional officers subpoenaed in Epstein investigation: report MORE misrepresented Mueller's findings in his summary of the investigation.

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Of those surveyed, 58 percent said Mueller should testify publicly, while another 14 percent said that the special counsel should give private, classified testimony to lawmakers.

McGahn's role as White House counsel has been scrutinized over Mueller's report, which detailed orders Trump reportedly gave to McGahn directing Mueller's firing, which McGahn reportedly refused while threatening to resign.

That instance along with others is now being probed by the House as potential obstruction of justice after Mueller did not come to a conclusion on the issue.

Sixty-seven percent of those surveyed said that McGahn should testify, including 10 percent who said he should do so only in a closed setting, according to the poll.

Still, the poll showed conflicting results over what Congress's direction should be in the wake of the investigation: 52 percent of Americans said that Congress should move on to other matters, a slight drop from last month's poll when 54 percent said Congress should drop its investigations.

The Monmouth poll surveyed 802 adults across the U.S. between May 16-20. The margin of error is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points.