Trump Jr. back for second interview with Intelligence panel

Donald Trump Jr.Donald (Don) John Trump2020 is not a family affair, for a change Pompeo jokes about speaking at Trump hotel: 'The guy who owns it' is 'going to be successful' Ex-sycophants highlight the void of competence around Trump MORE said he was "not at all" worried about committing perjury after he returned to Capitol Hill Wednesday for a second interview with the Senate Intelligence Committee.

The Republican-run Intelligence panel subpoenaed Trump Jr. for a second interview after President TrumpDonald John TrumpSupreme Court comes to Trump's aid on immigration Trump is failing on trade policy Trump holds call with Netanyahu to discuss possible US-Israel defense treaty MORE's former lawyer, Michael CohenMichael Dean CohenAggrieved Trump rips Dems for 'sad' impeachment effort Michael Cohen interviewed by NY prosecutors in hush money probe: report Falwell Jr. defends university's tweet pushing votes for Trump in reportedly rigged poll MORE, claimed earlier this year that Trump Jr. was more involved in discussions during the campaign about a possible real estate deal — known now as the Moscow Trump Tower project — than he had previously stated.

Asked Wednesday whether he plans to change his prior testimony, Trump Jr. replied: “Nothing to correct.”

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Trump Jr. and his Secret Service detail walked past a series of flashing cameras earlier Wednesday on his way into the closed-door meeting, which lasted a little less than three hours.

The president's eldest son was requested to discuss his actions during the 2016 presidential election.

Cohen told the House Oversight and Reform Committee in February that he briefed both Trump Jr. and Ivanka TrumpIvana (Ivanka) Marie Trump2020 is not a family affair, for a change Katy Tur says it is 'shameful' that Congress hasn't passed new family leave law OPIC should strengthen US-Argentine partnership with Vaca Muerta deal MORE on the project about 10 times, a statement that ran counter to Trump Jr.’s previous 2017 testimony before the Senate Judiciary Committee that he was only “peripherally aware” of the potential deal.

“Like I said, I was peripherally aware of it, but most of my knowledge has been gained since as it relates to hearing about it over the last few weeks,” Trump Jr. told the Judiciary panel in September 2017, according to a transcript.

Trump Jr., upon leaving the interview, took a swipe at Cohen's credibility.

"There was nothing to change. There needed to be clarification because Michael Cohen — who let us not forget is serving time right now for lying to these very investigative bodies," Trump Jr. told reporters.

"I’m glad that this is finally over. We were able to put some final clarity on that, and I think the committee understands that," he continued.

Cohen, who transformed from the president’s fixer to a critic, pleaded guilty last November to lying about discussions on the Moscow project within the Trump Organization.

Cohen has testified various times on Capitol Hill before both House and Senate committees examining events during the 2016 presidential election.

In February and March, Cohen testified before the House Intelligence Committee that President Trump’s attorney, Jay SekulowJay Alan SekulowHouse Democrats planning to hold hearings regarding Trump's role in hush-money payments: report Trump, RNC sue to block California law requiring release of tax returns Voters sue California over tax return law targeting Trump MORE, indirectly encouraged him to provide false testimony before Congress in 2017 about the duration of the discussions by telling him to “stay on message," according to a transcript of a released last month.

Attorneys for Sekulow have fiercely pushed back against this allegation, and President Trump and Republicans have repeated attacked his credibility, dubbing him as a known liar who can’t be trusted.

While the Moscow property plans never came to fruition, the discussions have become scrutinized — particularly among Democrats — who have raised concerns that President Trump was in talks to become financially involved with Russian President Vladimir PutinVladimir Vladimirovich PutinTaliban travels to Moscow after Trump declares talks dead Russians tune out Vladimir Putin Democrats must engage foreign policy to preserve liberal world order MORE. They also highlight that the president has denied having any business dealings with Russia.

Cohen also testified that while he briefed President Trump’s children on the project, it was “not with the same regularity that I did with Mr. Trump.”

"The way it would work is once the project would come to fruition, one of the three children would become assigned to the project, and I had the best working relationship with Don Jr. so he was the one that would become the family project manager on it,” Cohen told investigators in March.

As Trump Jr. was testifying on Wednesday, a top House Democrat sought to spotlight his Moscow talks across the Capitol.

"The president’s efforts to make money from a real estate project in Moscow and to conceal the transaction from the public are a quintessential example of a counterintelligence nightmare, that may or may not include criminal activity," House Intelligence Chairman Adam SchiffAdam Bennett SchiffHouse chairman subpoenas acting Trump intel chief over whistleblower complaint The Hill's Morning Report - Can Trump save GOP in North Carolina special election? Giuliani tears into Democrats after House opens probe into whether he pressured Ukraine to target Biden MORE (D-Calif.) said during public hearing on the counterintelligence implications of special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerFox's Cavuto roasts Trump over criticism of network Mueller report fades from political conversation Trump calls for probe of Obama book deal MORE’s investigation.

— This report was updated at 12:33 p.m.