Hope Hicks: Trump campaign felt 'relief' after WikiLeaks released damaging info about Hillary Clinton

Former White House communications director Hope HicksHope Charlotte HicksTrump: 'Top shows' on Fox News, cable are 'Fair (or great)' to me Trump criticizes Fox, which 'isn't working for us anymore' Sarah Huckabee Sanders becomes Fox News contributor MORE told the House Judiciary Committee Wednesday that she and members of the Trump campaign were relieved to see Wikileaks release damaging information stolen from Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonSanders supporters cry foul over Working Families endorsement of Warren The Hill's 12:30 Report: Trump heads to California Hillary Clinton: Voter suppression has led to 'crisis in democracy' in the US MORE's campaign.

During her closed-door interview with the committee, Hicks was asked by Rep. David CicillineDavid Nicola CicillineO'Rourke's debate moment reignites gun debate on Sunday shows Sunday shows - Guns dominate after Democratic debate Cicilline: O'Rourke's AR-15 comment 'doesn't help' MORE (D-R.I.) whether the campaign "was happy" to "receive information that was damaging to Hillary Clinton."

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“I think that ‘happy’ is not – I don't think that's a fair characterization. I think ‘relief that we weren't the only campaign with issues’ is more accurate,” Hicks said, according to a 273-page transcript of her interview.

Hicks also referenced the unverified dossier of claims about President TrumpDonald John TrumpBusiness, ballots and battling opioids: Why the Universal Postal Union benefits the US Sanders supporters cry foul over Working Families endorsement of Warren California poll: Biden, Sanders lead Democratic field; Harris takes fifth MORE's ties to Russia authored by former British intelligence agent Christopher Steele during her testimony when asked if she would accept compromising information on an opponent during an election from a foreign source.

“I'm asking you this based on your experience and the expertise you've developed, would you take foreign oppo information from a foreign government, if that were offered when working on a political campaign?” Norm Eisen, a committee lawyer, asked Hicks.

“You know, knowing how much chaos has been sowed as a result of something like the Steele dossier, no, I would not,” Hicks responded.

Hicks' testimony was met with derision from Democrats on Thursday after the White House's order for her to not answer questions related to the Trump presidency or White House transition team resulted in many questions going unanswered.

“As a matter of longstanding executive branch precedent in the Department of Justice practice and advice, as a former senior adviser to the President, Ms. Hicks may not be compelled to speak about events that occurred during her service as a senior adviser to the President. That question touched upon that area,” a White House deputy counsel informed lawmakers, an explanation which committee chairman Rep. Jerry NadlerJerrold (Jerry) Lewis NadlerJudiciary Committee chairman Nadler dismisses Kavanaugh impeachment calls Nadler: Trump impeachment needed 'to vindicate the Constitution' Words matter, except to Democrats, when it involves impeaching Trump MORE (D-N.Y.) called "absolute nonsense."