Democrats take another stab at preventing foreign election interference

Democrats take another stab at preventing foreign election interference

House Democrats introduced legislation Tuesday that would require campaigns to report any foreign contacts to federal authorities, the latest push for election security following last week's warnings from former special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerTrump says he'll release financial records before election, knocks Dems' efforts House impeachment hearings: The witch hunt continues Speier says impeachment inquiry shows 'very strong case of bribery' by Trump MORE.

The measure -- sponsored by Democratic Reps. Elissa SlotkinElissa SlotkinIran building hidden arsenal of short-range ballistic missiles in Iraq: report Democrats debate scope of impeachment charges Democrats hit gas on impeachment MORE (Mich.), Lauren UnderwoodLauren UnderwoodRep. Veronica Escobar elected to represent freshman class in House leadership Brindisi, Lamb recommended for Armed Services, Transportation Committees Club for Growth extends advertising against House Dems over impeachment MORE (Ill.), and Jason CrowJason CrowColorado rep planning sunrise run to possible sites for military memorial Bill introduced to give special immigrant visas to Kurds who helped US in Syria Congress set for showdown with Trump over Kurds MORE (Colo.) -- would mandate federal campaigns to inform the FBI and Federal Election Commission about any foreign contacts who attempt to donate funds or assist a candidate.

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Campaigns would also be required to implement a “compliance system” to monitor communication with those foreign contacts.

“Guarding our country against another attack on our political system should not be a partisan issue — it is a national security issue and it’s an American issue,” Slotkin said in a statement.

The bill will be referred to the House Administration Committee.

Election security is back in the spotlight after Mueller’s testimony before the House Judiciary and Intelligence committees, during which he warned that Russia is working to interfere in the 2020 elections “as we sit here.”

Senate Democrats used Mueller’s testimony to make a renewed push for passing legislation in the GOP-controlled Senate, but they were rebuffed by Republicans who blocked various bills.

Sen. Mark WarnerMark Robert WarnerHillicon Valley: FTC rules Cambridge Analytica engaged in 'deceptive practices' | NATO researchers warn social media failing to remove fake accounts | Sanders calls for breaking up Comcast, Verizon Bipartisan senators call on FERC to protect against Huawei threats Hillicon Valley: House passes anti-robocall bill | Senators inch forward on privacy legislation | Trump escalates fight over tech tax | Illinois families sue TikTok | Senators get classified briefing on ransomware MORE (D-Va.), who in May introduced a measure similar to the one put forth Tuesday by House Democrats, attempted to pass the bill by unanimous consent last week, but Sen. Cindy Hyde-Smith (R-Miss.) blocked that attempt.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellKey House and Senate health leaders reach deal to stop surprise medical bills Biden: 'No party should have too much power' Overnight Energy: Pelosi vows bold action to counter 'existential' climate threat | Trump jokes new light bulbs don't make him look as good | 'Forever chemicals' measure pulled from defense bill MORE (R-Ky.), who also thwarted Democratic efforts to pass election security measures, argued the bills needed to be more bipartisan.

The House has already passed two sweeping election security bills this year: H.R. 1, which contains language around voting reform, and the Securing America's Federal Elections, which would give states additional funding to secure election infrastructure and set certain requirements for voting systems.

Both measures passed along mostly party-line votes, and McConnell has refused to take them up in the Senate.