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Democrats take another stab at preventing foreign election interference

Democrats take another stab at preventing foreign election interference

House Democrats introduced legislation Tuesday that would require campaigns to report any foreign contacts to federal authorities, the latest push for election security following last week's warnings from former special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) MuellerSenate Democrats urge Garland not to fight court order to release Trump obstruction memo Why a special counsel is guaranteed if Biden chooses Yates, Cuomo or Jones as AG Barr taps attorney investigating Russia probe origins as special counsel MORE.

The measure -- sponsored by Democratic Reps. Elissa SlotkinElissa SlotkinDHS official told lawmakers there's concern about Trump August reinstatement conspiracy theory Exclusive: Conservative group targets vulnerable Democrats over abortion Republicans eye Nashville crack-up to gain House seat MORE (Mich.), Lauren UnderwoodLauren UnderwoodHollywood goes all in for the For the People Act McAuliffe looms large as Virginia Democrats pick governor nominee For The People Act will empower small donors and increase representation in our democracy MORE (Ill.), and Jason CrowJason CrowOvernight Defense: Biden, Putin agree to launch arms control talks at summit | 2002 war authorization repeal will get Senate vote | GOP rep warns Biden 'blood with be on his hands' without Afghan interpreter evacuation GOP rep: If Biden doesn't evacuate Afghan interpreters, 'blood will be on his hands' Pelosi floats Democrat-led investigation of Jan. 6 as commission alternative MORE (Colo.) -- would mandate federal campaigns to inform the FBI and Federal Election Commission about any foreign contacts who attempt to donate funds or assist a candidate.

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Campaigns would also be required to implement a “compliance system” to monitor communication with those foreign contacts.

“Guarding our country against another attack on our political system should not be a partisan issue — it is a national security issue and it’s an American issue,” Slotkin said in a statement.

The bill will be referred to the House Administration Committee.

Election security is back in the spotlight after Mueller’s testimony before the House Judiciary and Intelligence committees, during which he warned that Russia is working to interfere in the 2020 elections “as we sit here.”

Senate Democrats used Mueller’s testimony to make a renewed push for passing legislation in the GOP-controlled Senate, but they were rebuffed by Republicans who blocked various bills.

Sen. Mark WarnerMark Robert WarnerBiden at Sen. John Warner's funeral: He 'gave me confidence' White House advisers huddle with Senate moderates on infrastructure Biden risks break with progressives on infrastructure MORE (D-Va.), who in May introduced a measure similar to the one put forth Tuesday by House Democrats, attempted to pass the bill by unanimous consent last week, but Sen. Cindy Hyde-Smith (R-Miss.) blocked that attempt.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellRevs. Jesse Jackson, William Barber arrested in protest urging Manchin to nix filibuster On The Money: Biden announces bipartisan deal on infrastructure, but Democratic leaders hold out for more McConnell slams Biden for already 'caving' to left on infrastructure deal MORE (R-Ky.), who also thwarted Democratic efforts to pass election security measures, argued the bills needed to be more bipartisan.

The House has already passed two sweeping election security bills this year: H.R. 1, which contains language around voting reform, and the Securing America's Federal Elections, which would give states additional funding to secure election infrastructure and set certain requirements for voting systems.

Both measures passed along mostly party-line votes, and McConnell has refused to take them up in the Senate.