Democrats take another stab at preventing foreign election interference

Democrats take another stab at preventing foreign election interference

House Democrats introduced legislation Tuesday that would require campaigns to report any foreign contacts to federal authorities, the latest push for election security following last week's warnings from former special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) MuellerCNN's Toobin warns McCabe is in 'perilous condition' with emboldened Trump CNN anchor rips Trump over Stone while evoking Clinton-Lynch tarmac meeting The Hill's 12:30 Report: New Hampshire fallout MORE.

The measure -- sponsored by Democratic Reps. Elissa SlotkinElissa SlotkinPaul Junge wins Michigan GOP primary to challenge Elissa Slotkin Overnight Defense: US formally rejects Beijing's South China Sea claims | House set to consider defense policy bill next week | 57 injured as firefighters battle warship blaze House Democrat warns about 'inaccurate' polls: Trump voters 'fundamentally undercounted' MORE (Mich.), Lauren UnderwoodLauren UnderwoodObama announces first wave of 2020 endorsements The Hill's Coronavirus Report: GoDaddy CEO Aman Bhutani says DC policymakers need to do more to support ventures and 'solo-preneurs'; Federal unemployment benefits expire as coronavirus deal-making deadlocks The Hill's Coronavirus Report: iBIO Chairman and CEO Thomas Isett says developing a safe vaccine is paramount; US surpasses 150,000 coronavirus deaths with roughy one death per minute MORE (Ill.), and Jason CrowJason CrowTrump-Afghan deal passes key deadline, but peace elusive Cook shifts 20 House districts toward Democrats Congressional inconsistency continues regarding war powers MORE (Colo.) -- would mandate federal campaigns to inform the FBI and Federal Election Commission about any foreign contacts who attempt to donate funds or assist a candidate.

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Campaigns would also be required to implement a “compliance system” to monitor communication with those foreign contacts.

“Guarding our country against another attack on our political system should not be a partisan issue — it is a national security issue and it’s an American issue,” Slotkin said in a statement.

The bill will be referred to the House Administration Committee.

Election security is back in the spotlight after Mueller’s testimony before the House Judiciary and Intelligence committees, during which he warned that Russia is working to interfere in the 2020 elections “as we sit here.”

Senate Democrats used Mueller’s testimony to make a renewed push for passing legislation in the GOP-controlled Senate, but they were rebuffed by Republicans who blocked various bills.

Sen. Mark WarnerMark Robert WarnerThe Hill's Campaign Report: US officials say Russia, China are looking to sow discord in election US intelligence says Russia seeking to 'denigrate' Biden GOP chairmen hit back at accusation they are spreading disinformation with Biden probe MORE (D-Va.), who in May introduced a measure similar to the one put forth Tuesday by House Democrats, attempted to pass the bill by unanimous consent last week, but Sen. Cindy Hyde-Smith (R-Miss.) blocked that attempt.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellCoronavirus talks collapse as negotiators fail to reach deal Pelosi, Schumer say White House declined T coronavirus deal COVID-19 bill limiting liability would strike the wrong balance MORE (R-Ky.), who also thwarted Democratic efforts to pass election security measures, argued the bills needed to be more bipartisan.

The House has already passed two sweeping election security bills this year: H.R. 1, which contains language around voting reform, and the Securing America's Federal Elections, which would give states additional funding to secure election infrastructure and set certain requirements for voting systems.

Both measures passed along mostly party-line votes, and McConnell has refused to take them up in the Senate.