Democrats take another stab at preventing foreign election interference

Democrats take another stab at preventing foreign election interference

House Democrats introduced legislation Tuesday that would require campaigns to report any foreign contacts to federal authorities, the latest push for election security following last week's warnings from former special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerMueller report fades from political conversation Trump calls for probe of Obama book deal Democrats express private disappointment with Mueller testimony MORE.

The measure -- sponsored by Democratic Reps. Elissa SlotkinElissa SlotkinMueller report fades from political conversation House Democrats urge Trump to end deportations of Iraqis after diabetic man's death Hillicon Valley: Capital One faces investigation over massive breach | DHS warns of cyber vulnerability in small aircraft | Senate bill would ban 'addictive' social media features MORE (Mich.), Lauren UnderwoodLauren UnderwoodThe Hill's Morning Report - Trump hews to NRA on guns and eyes lower taxes Second Democrat representing Trump district backs impeachment Hillicon Valley: Capital One faces investigation over massive breach | DHS warns of cyber vulnerability in small aircraft | Senate bill would ban 'addictive' social media features MORE (Ill.), and Jason CrowJason CrowSecond Democrat representing Trump district backs impeachment House Democrats request sit-down with McConnell to talk guns Assault weapons ban picks up steam in Congress MORE (Colo.) -- would mandate federal campaigns to inform the FBI and Federal Election Commission about any foreign contacts who attempt to donate funds or assist a candidate.

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Campaigns would also be required to implement a “compliance system” to monitor communication with those foreign contacts.

“Guarding our country against another attack on our political system should not be a partisan issue — it is a national security issue and it’s an American issue,” Slotkin said in a statement.

The bill will be referred to the House Administration Committee.

Election security is back in the spotlight after Mueller’s testimony before the House Judiciary and Intelligence committees, during which he warned that Russia is working to interfere in the 2020 elections “as we sit here.”

Senate Democrats used Mueller’s testimony to make a renewed push for passing legislation in the GOP-controlled Senate, but they were rebuffed by Republicans who blocked various bills.

Sen. Mark WarnerMark Robert WarnerLawmakers sound alarm on China's disinformation campaign in Hong Kong Facebook users in lawsuit say company failed to warn them of known risks before 2018 breach New intel chief inherits host of challenges MORE (D-Va.), who in May introduced a measure similar to the one put forth Tuesday by House Democrats, attempted to pass the bill by unanimous consent last week, but Sen. Cindy Hyde-Smith (R-Miss.) blocked that attempt.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellMcConnell rejects Democrats' 'radical movement' to abolish filibuster Hickenlooper announces Senate bid Trump orders elimination of student loan debt for thousands of disabled veterans MORE (R-Ky.), who also thwarted Democratic efforts to pass election security measures, argued the bills needed to be more bipartisan.

The House has already passed two sweeping election security bills this year: H.R. 1, which contains language around voting reform, and the Securing America's Federal Elections, which would give states additional funding to secure election infrastructure and set certain requirements for voting systems.

Both measures passed along mostly party-line votes, and McConnell has refused to take them up in the Senate.