Democrats take another stab at preventing foreign election interference

Democrats take another stab at preventing foreign election interference

House Democrats introduced legislation Tuesday that would require campaigns to report any foreign contacts to federal authorities, the latest push for election security following last week's warnings from former special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerSchiff: Trump acquittal in Senate trial would not signal a 'failure' Jeffries blasts Trump for attack on Thunberg at impeachment hearing Live coverage: House Judiciary to vote on impeachment after surprise delay MORE.

The measure -- sponsored by Democratic Reps. Elissa SlotkinElissa SlotkinMixed feelings on war power limits: Lawmakers and vet candidates Democrats plot new approach to win over rural voters Iran resolution supporters fear impeachment will put it on back burner MORE (Mich.), Lauren UnderwoodLauren UnderwoodAyanna Pressley's 'squad' of congresswomen offers support after she opens up about alopecia Democrats worry party is squandering political opportunity on ObamaCare Overnight Health Care — Presented by Rare Access Action Project — Court ruling reignites ObamaCare fight for 2020 | Congress expands probe into surprise billing | Health industry racks up wins in year-end spending deal MORE (Ill.), and Jason CrowJason CrowFemale impeachment managers say American public know a 'rigged' trial when they see one Restlessness, light rule-breaking and milk spotted on Senate floor as impeachment trial rolls on Abortion protester briefly interrupts impeachment trial MORE (Colo.) -- would mandate federal campaigns to inform the FBI and Federal Election Commission about any foreign contacts who attempt to donate funds or assist a candidate.

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Campaigns would also be required to implement a “compliance system” to monitor communication with those foreign contacts.

“Guarding our country against another attack on our political system should not be a partisan issue — it is a national security issue and it’s an American issue,” Slotkin said in a statement.

The bill will be referred to the House Administration Committee.

Election security is back in the spotlight after Mueller’s testimony before the House Judiciary and Intelligence committees, during which he warned that Russia is working to interfere in the 2020 elections “as we sit here.”

Senate Democrats used Mueller’s testimony to make a renewed push for passing legislation in the GOP-controlled Senate, but they were rebuffed by Republicans who blocked various bills.

Sen. Mark WarnerMark Robert WarnerHillicon Valley — Presented by Philip Morris International — Bezos phone breach raises fears over Saudi hacking | Amazon seeks to halt Microsoft's work on 'war cloud' | Lawmakers unveil surveillance reform bill Bezos phone breach escalates fears over Saudi hacking MSNBC's Chris Hayes knocks senators for ducking out of impeachment trial: 'You can resign' MORE (D-Va.), who in May introduced a measure similar to the one put forth Tuesday by House Democrats, attempted to pass the bill by unanimous consent last week, but Sen. Cindy Hyde-Smith (R-Miss.) blocked that attempt.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellSenate Republicans confident they'll win fight on witnesses The Hill's 12:30 Report: Dems to present case on abuse of power on trial's third day The Hill's Morning Report - House prosecutes Trump as 'lawless,' 'corrupt' MORE (R-Ky.), who also thwarted Democratic efforts to pass election security measures, argued the bills needed to be more bipartisan.

The House has already passed two sweeping election security bills this year: H.R. 1, which contains language around voting reform, and the Securing America's Federal Elections, which would give states additional funding to secure election infrastructure and set certain requirements for voting systems.

Both measures passed along mostly party-line votes, and McConnell has refused to take them up in the Senate.