Democrats to question Corey Lewandowski as they investigate possible obstruction by Trump

Democrats to question Corey Lewandowski as they investigate possible obstruction by Trump
© Greg Nash

The House Judiciary Committee has secured the testimony of President TrumpDonald TrumpTexas announces election audit in four counties after Trump demand Schumer sets Monday showdown on debt ceiling-government funding bill Pennsylvania AG sues to block GOP subpoenas in election probe MORE's former campaign manager Corey LewandowskiCorey LewandowskiTrump to ramp up travel schedule, head back to Mar-a-Lago, adviser says Biden White House moves to oust Trump appointees from advisory boards Trump budget chief refuses to resign from Naval Academy board MORE later this month, marking the first public appearance of a Trump ally as Democrats seek to investigate possible obstruction by the president.

Judiciary Chairman Jerrold NadlerJerrold (Jerry) Lewis NadlerBiden to raise refugee cap to 125,000 in October Ocasio-Cortez, Bush push to add expanded unemployment in .5T spending plan Angelina Jolie spotted in Capitol meeting with senators MORE (D-N.Y.), who subpoenaed Lewandowski to testify by Sept. 17, announced on Monday that he would appear on that date.

Nadler has also subpoenaed former White House officials Rob Porter and Rick Dearborn to testify with Lewandowski at a joint hearing, noting that all three are tied to a key episode of possible obstruction by Trump described in former special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) MuellerSenate Democrats urge Garland not to fight court order to release Trump obstruction memo Why a special counsel is guaranteed if Biden chooses Yates, Cuomo or Jones as AG Barr taps attorney investigating Russia probe origins as special counsel MORE’s report.

But it is unclear if Porter and Dearborn will appear, since the White House has successfully blocked both former and current officials from testifying publicly up until this point.

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The White House has argued that confidentiality protections offered to the executive branch apply to current and former aides. This effectively prevents them from disclosing what took place during their time in the administration, the White House contends.

While both Republican and Democratic administrations have invoked the immunity concept, legal experts say there is virtually no case law on the subject. Some predict the White House is likely to lose if challenged in court.

Lewandowski, who never served in the Trump administration and therefore is outside the White House’s current claims of immunity, publicly stated that he would testify before the committee, vowing he would do so with the goal of defending the president.

“I am an open book. I want to go and remind the American people that these guys are on a witch hunt, right?” Lewandowski, who is considering a New Hampshire Senate run, told Fox News Radio last month.