Democrats to question Corey Lewandowski as they investigate possible obstruction by Trump

Democrats to question Corey Lewandowski as they investigate possible obstruction by Trump
© Greg Nash

The House Judiciary Committee has secured the testimony of President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump suggests Sotomayor, Ginsburg should have to recuse themselves on 'Trump related' cases Sanders says idea he can't work with Republicans is 'total nonsense' Sanders releases list of how to pay for his proposals MORE's former campaign manager Corey LewandowskiCorey R. LewandowskiThe Hill's Morning Report - Sanders repeats with NH primary win, but with narrower victory Trump campaign chief relocating to Washington: report Lewandowski decides against Senate bid MORE later this month, marking the first public appearance of a Trump ally as Democrats seek to investigate possible obstruction by the president.

Judiciary Chairman Jerrold NadlerJerrold (Jerry) Lewis NadlerThis week: House to vote on legislation to make lynching a federal hate crime Congress set for clash over surveillance reforms Trump adviser presses House investigators to make Bezos testify MORE (D-N.Y.), who subpoenaed Lewandowski to testify by Sept. 17, announced on Monday that he would appear on that date.

Nadler has also subpoenaed former White House officials Rob Porter and Rick Dearborn to testify with Lewandowski at a joint hearing, noting that all three are tied to a key episode of possible obstruction by Trump described in former special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerCNN's Toobin warns McCabe is in 'perilous condition' with emboldened Trump CNN anchor rips Trump over Stone while evoking Clinton-Lynch tarmac meeting The Hill's 12:30 Report: New Hampshire fallout MORE’s report.

But it is unclear if Porter and Dearborn will appear, since the White House has successfully blocked both former and current officials from testifying publicly up until this point.

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The White House has argued that confidentiality protections offered to the executive branch apply to current and former aides. This effectively prevents them from disclosing what took place during their time in the administration, the White House contends.

While both Republican and Democratic administrations have invoked the immunity concept, legal experts say there is virtually no case law on the subject. Some predict the White House is likely to lose if challenged in court.

Lewandowski, who never served in the Trump administration and therefore is outside the White House’s current claims of immunity, publicly stated that he would testify before the committee, vowing he would do so with the goal of defending the president.

“I am an open book. I want to go and remind the American people that these guys are on a witch hunt, right?” Lewandowski, who is considering a New Hampshire Senate run, told Fox News Radio last month.