Ten notable Democrats who do not favor impeachment

Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiAs families deal with coronavirus, new federal dollars should follow the student Sunday shows - Ruth Bader Ginsburg's death dominates Hypocrisy rules on both sides over replacing Justice Ginsburg MORE (D-Calif.) is facing pressure from a growing number of Democrats to start an impeachment inquiry against President TrumpDonald John TrumpBiden leads Trump by 36 points nationally among Latinos: poll Trump dismisses climate change role in fires, says Newsom needs to manage forest better Jimmy Kimmel hits Trump for rallies while hosting Emmy Awards MORE.

The number of Democrats backing an inquiry has steadily grown over the recess, with a majority now endorsing it.

Yet there are a number of influential lawmakers who are not calling for impeachment, showing that Pelosi has allies in the internal caucus debate.

Here are 10 notable Democrats who do not favor impeachment.

1. Rep. Hakeem JeffriesHakeem Sekou JeffriesPelosi: House will stay in session until agreement is reached on coronavirus relief Races heat up for House leadership posts Postmaster general earned millions from company with ties to Postal Service: report MORE (D-N.Y.)

Jeffries, the possible future Speaker after Pelosi steps down, has not added his support to an inquiry.

The House Democratic Caucus chairman's stance stands out against possible rivals to succeed Pelosi such as Reps. David CicillineDavid Nicola CicillineClark rolls out endorsements in assistant Speaker race Races heat up for House leadership posts The folly of Cicilline's 'Glass-Steagall for Tech' MORE (R.I.) and Katherine ClarkKatherine Marlea ClarkRep. Robin Kelly enters race for Democratic caucus vice chair Clark rolls out endorsements in assistant Speaker race Races heat up for House leadership posts MORE (Mass.), who are backing it.

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Jeffries previously voiced support for the 2018 articles of impeachment introduced by Rep. Al GreenAlexander (Al) N. GreenThe Memo: Trump's race tactics fall flat Trump administration ending support for 7 Texas testing sites as coronavirus cases spike The Hill's Coronavirus Report: Miami mayor worries about suicide and domestic violence rise; Trump-governor debate intensifies MORE (D-Texas), but he has since embraced Pelosi’s view.

That probably doesn’t hurt his relationship with Pelosi, but it will draw criticism from liberal grassroots groups that back impeachment and could also hurt him in a leadership race.

Jeffries says he backs the House Judiciary Committee’s investigations into Trump.

“Mr. Jeffries supports, and is participating in, the House Judiciary Committee investigation, which includes an assessment as to whether the President committed High Crimes & Misdemeanors,” Michael Hardaway, a spokesman for Jeffries, told The Hill in a statement.

2. Rep. John LewisJohn LewisPelosi orders Capitol flags at half-staff to honor Ginsburg Kamala Harris: Black Americans have been 'disproportionately harmed' by Trump LWCF modernization: Restoring the promise MORE (D-Ga.)

Lewis voted to advance impeachment-related bills in the GOP Congress but has not come out in favor of opening an inquiry since Democrats regained their majority.

The civil rights icon is the elder statesman of the Georgia Democratic delegation, which has been unanimous in not backing an inquiry.

If Lewis changed course, it would almost undoubtedly lead others to back an inquiry since he carries enormous sway through the caucus, especially in the Georgia delegation and the Congressional Black Caucus.

3. Rep. Ro KhannaRohit (Ro) KhannaThe Hill Interview: Jerry Brown on climate disasters, COVID-19 and Biden's 'Rooseveltian moment' Congress needs to prioritize government digital service delivery DeJoy defends Postal Service changes at combative House hearing MORE (D-Calif.)

Khanna, a leader of the Congressional Progressive Caucus, is a notable progressive not outwardly backing launching into an impeachment inquiry.

He does back the House Judiciary Committee’s investigation, which the panel’s chairman has likened to impeachment, and he appears on whip lists by The Hill and other media outlets as a “yes” on impeachment because he says the panel’s actions essentially represent an inquiry.

“I would vote ‘yes’ to formally start the inquiry, but I don't think it requires that vote,” Khanna told reporters on Capitol Hill last month.

“Well, I support Nadler. I support the impeachment inquiry,” he told MSNBC last month, referring to House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold NadlerJerrold (Jerry) Lewis NadlerSchumer: 'Nothing is off the table' if GOP moves forward with Ginsburg replacement Top Democrats call for DOJ watchdog to probe Barr over possible 2020 election influence House passes bill to protect pregnant workers MORE (D-N.Y.).

But he is not actually calling for a literal inquiry that requires a vote of the House and has provided vocal support for Pelosi’s approach, giving cover to the Speaker from liberals who want her to be more aggressive.

A spokesperson said it is a correct characterization that he is not part of the group calling for an impeachment inquiry to be opened.

4. Rep. Richard NealRichard Edmund NealRep. Cedric Richmond set to join House Ways and Means Committee Coons beats back progressive Senate primary challenger in Delaware Pelosi: House will stay in session until agreement is reached on coronavirus relief MORE (D-Mass.)

Neal, like a number of other committee chairs, has not come out in support of impeachment despite pressure from the left and a primary challenge.

Holyoke, Mass., Mayor Alex Morse is running against Neal on the issue of impeachment while grassroots groups hit him for his stance.

Neal and other chairs who aren’t backing impeachment are showing loyalty and support to Pelosi, making their stance significant.

5. Rep. Gregory MeeksGregory Weldon MeeksBottom line Democrats go big on diversity with new House recruits Chamber of Commerce, banking industry groups call on Senate to pass corporate diversity bill MORE (D-N.Y.)

Meeks says he favors removing Trump but wants to do it in a cautious way.

He suggests it would do little good to impeach Trump if there is not going to be a conviction, something that would require 67 votes in the GOP-controlled Senate.

“As a former Assistant District Attorney, I understand the difference between an indictment and a conviction,” Meeks said in a statement to The Hill.

He says Democrats “should continue to allow every committee, not just the Judiciary Committee, to continue to exercise its constitutional oversight responsibilities. That would allow us to get the evidence that could lead to a conviction, or otherwise demonstrate to the public this President’s culture of corruption so that we remove him through the polls in 2020.”

6. Rep. Frederica WilsonFrederica Patricia WilsonHarris calls it 'outrageous' Trump downplayed coronavirus House passes bill establishing commission to study racial disparities affecting Black men, boys Florida county official apologizes for social media post invoking Hitler  MORE (D-Fla.)

Wilson is another black lawmaker who is not backing an inquiry, despite Trump’s unpopularity with black voters in general and her own public battles with the president.

Wilson got into it with Trump when she was listening in on a condolence call the president made to the widow of Sgt. La David Johnson, one of the U.S. Green Berets killed in an ambush in Niger in October 2017. Trump said during that call that Johnson “knew what he signed up for,” according to Wilson, who made the remarks public.

“That is not what you say to a grieving widow, a woman who just learned that her husband cannot have an open casket funeral,” said Wilson, whose revelation led to a days-long controversy.

Trump called her “wacky” and accused her of lying.

Also notable is that a majority of Democratic lawmakers from Florida, a key state in the 2020 race, have not backed impeachment.

7. Rep. Terri SewellTerrycina (Terri) Andrea SewellRevered civil rights leader Rep. John Lewis lies in state in the Capitol House approves Clyburn proposal to rename voting rights bill after John Lewis John Lewis carried across Edmund Pettus Bridge for last time MORE (D-Ala.)

Sewell is the only House Democrat in Alabama, and she has not voiced support for impeachment.

She represents a district that voted overwhelmingly for Democratic presidential nominee Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonBiden leads Trump by 36 points nationally among Latinos: poll Democratic super PAC to hit Trump in battleground states over coronavirus deaths Battle lines drawn on precedent in Supreme Court fight MORE in 2016. Trump easily won the state, and the districts surrounding Sewell’s are strong Republican footholds.

Sewell, a member of both the Congressional Black Caucus and the House Intelligence Committee, has called for the House to focus on its investigations before moving toward impeachment.

“While nothing is off the table, I believe the relevant committees must continue to investigate before moving to impeachment proceedings,” Sewell said in a statement.

8. Rep. Marcy KapturMarcia (Marcy) Carolyn KapturUkraine language in GOP platform underscores Trump tensions Eye on gavel, Wasserman Schultz proposes panel on racial inequality in spending Overnight Defense: Army now willing to rename bases named after Confederates | Dems demand answers on 'unfathomable' nuke testing discussions | Pentagon confirms death of north African al Qaeda leader MORE (D-Ohio)

Kaptur, the longest serving woman in the House, is the only Ohio Democrat in the lower chamber to not support impeachment.

Kaptur, a centrist who won her district against a Republican challenger by roughly 37 points, has not shied away from criticizing the president, but she has followed Pelosi’s lead in calling for the focus to be on House investigations.

“Congress must continue to work to find the truth and hold President Trump and his campaign and business associates accountable,” Kaptur said in a statement to Toledo Blade in June.

“Only through thorough investigations by all the committees of jurisdiction will we get at the full truth and the full extent to which America’s interests have been compromised through Russian meddling and people at the highest levels dealing in their own self-interest.”

9. Rep. Daniel LipinskiDaniel William LipinskiFive things we learned from this year's primaries Hispanic Caucus campaign arm endorses slate of non-Hispanic candidates Bottom line MORE (D-Ill.)

Lipinski, a conservative Democrat who has seen colleagues support his primary rivals, is not backing an impeachment inquiry.

He and Rep. Cheri BustosCheryl (Cheri) Lea BustosThe Hill's Campaign Report: Biden asks if public can trust vaccine from Trump ahead of Election Day | Oklahoma health officials raised red flags before Trump rally DCCC dropping million on voter education program Clark rolls out endorsements in assistant Speaker race MORE (Ill.), who leads House Democrats’ campaign arm, are the only two Illinois Democrats not in favor of an inquiry.

Lipinski, who has previously pointed to the public polls that suggest a majority of voters do not support removing the president, warns that jumping into impeachment could backfire.

“Right now, I think the best way to remove President Trump from office is voting him out in the 2020 election,” Lipinski said in a statement to The Hill. “This may change as the work of House committees continue, but if the House impeached the president now, it could backfire because the president would be able to say that he was persecuted by the Democratic House but exonerated by the Senate.”

Lipinski is once again facing a primary race. And while Pelosi has supported him in the past, as she does for all incumbents, his opponent is likely to attack him from the left on issues like impeachment and his conservative views on abortion.

10. Rep. Bobby ScottRobert (Bobby) Cortez ScottHouse passes bill to allow private lawsuits against public schools for discriminatory practices Pelosi: House will stay in session until agreement is reached on coronavirus relief This week: House returns for pre-election sprint MORE (D-Va.)

Scott opposed the GOP effort to impeach President Clinton in 1998 and has not supported the launching of an inquiry against Trump.

The first African American elected to Congress from Virginia since Reconstruction, he would carry sway with members of his caucus and state if he backed an inquiry. His opposition could give cover to vulnerable Democrats in Virginia, such as Reps. Abigail SpanbergerAbigail Davis SpanbergerTrump asked Chamber of Commerce to reconsider Democratic endorsements: report Virginians wait up to four hours to cast early voting ballots The Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by The Air Line Pilots Association - Pence lauds Harris as 'experienced debater'; Trump, Biden diverge over debate prep MORE and Elaine LuriaElaine Goodman LuriaVirginians wait up to four hours to cast early voting ballots US Chamber of Commerce set to endorse 23 House freshman Democrats House panel votes against curtailing Insurrection Act powers after heated debate MORE.

Mike Lillis contributed.