Ten notable Democrats who do not favor impeachment

Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiLouisiana governor wins re-election Dynamic scoring: Forward-thinking budgeting practices to grow our economy Pelosi: Trump tweets on Yovanovitch show his 'insecurity as an imposter' MORE (D-Calif.) is facing pressure from a growing number of Democrats to start an impeachment inquiry against President TrumpDonald John TrumpGOP divided over impeachment trial strategy Official testifies that Bolton had 'one-on-one meeting' with Trump over Ukraine aid Louisiana governor wins re-election MORE.

The number of Democrats backing an inquiry has steadily grown over the recess, with a majority now endorsing it.

Yet there are a number of influential lawmakers who are not calling for impeachment, showing that Pelosi has allies in the internal caucus debate.

Here are 10 notable Democrats who do not favor impeachment.

1. Rep. Hakeem JeffriesHakeem Sekou JeffriesUSMCA deal close, but not 'imminent,' Democrats say House Democrat's Halloween display mourns passed bills that die in McConnell's 'legislative graveyard' Democrats unveil impeachment procedures MORE (D-N.Y.)

Jeffries, the possible future Speaker after Pelosi steps down, has not added his support to an inquiry.

The House Democratic Caucus chairman's stance stands out against possible rivals to succeed Pelosi such as Reps. David CicillineDavid Nicola CicillineHillicon Valley: Federal inquiry opened into Google health data deal | Facebook reports millions of post takedowns | Microsoft shakes up privacy debate | Disney plus tops 10M sign-ups in first day Top antitrust Dem presses DOJ, FTC on Google's Fitbit acquisition Hillicon Valley: California AG reveals Facebook investigation | McConnell criticizes Twitter's political ad ban | Lawmakers raise concerns over Google takeover of Fitbit | Dem pushes FCC to secure 5G networks MORE (R.I.) and Katherine ClarkKatherine Marlea ClarkThe Hill's Morning Report - Fallout from day one of Trump impeachment hearing 'Squad' members recruit Raskin to run for Oversight gavel House passes third bill aimed at preventing foreign election interference MORE (Mass.), who are backing it.

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Jeffries previously voiced support for the 2018 articles of impeachment introduced by Rep. Al GreenAlexander (Al) N. GreenTrump administration suspends oil and gas production on 130 plots in Utah after challenge Why fear should not blind us to the promise of AI: A healthy dose of optimism Trump at rally says impeachment an 'attack on democracy itself' MORE (D-Texas), but he has since embraced Pelosi’s view.

That probably doesn’t hurt his relationship with Pelosi, but it will draw criticism from liberal grassroots groups that back impeachment and could also hurt him in a leadership race.

Jeffries says he backs the House Judiciary Committee’s investigations into Trump.

“Mr. Jeffries supports, and is participating in, the House Judiciary Committee investigation, which includes an assessment as to whether the President committed High Crimes & Misdemeanors,” Michael Hardaway, a spokesman for Jeffries, told The Hill in a statement.

2. Rep. John LewisJohn LewisDemocrats ramp up oversight efforts over 'opportunity zone' incentive The 13 House Democrats who back Kavanaugh's impeachment Detroit police chief calls Tlaib facial recognization idea 'racist' MORE (D-Ga.)

Lewis voted to advance impeachment-related bills in the GOP Congress but has not come out in favor of opening an inquiry since Democrats regained their majority.

The civil rights icon is the elder statesman of the Georgia Democratic delegation, which has been unanimous in not backing an inquiry.

If Lewis changed course, it would almost undoubtedly lead others to back an inquiry since he carries enormous sway through the caucus, especially in the Georgia delegation and the Congressional Black Caucus.

3. Rep. Ro KhannaRohit (Ro) KhannaDemocratic lawmaker: It 'defies logic' for Trump to push Ukraine to investigate Biden Overnight Health Care: CDC links vitamin E oil to vaping illnesses | White House calls Pelosi drug price plan 'unworkable' | Dem offers bill for state-based 'Medicare for All' Justice Democrats official denies that progressives struggle with electability MORE (D-Calif.)

Khanna, a leader of the Congressional Progressive Caucus, is a notable progressive not outwardly backing launching into an impeachment inquiry.

He does back the House Judiciary Committee’s investigation, which the panel’s chairman has likened to impeachment, and he appears on whip lists by The Hill and other media outlets as a “yes” on impeachment because he says the panel’s actions essentially represent an inquiry.

“I would vote ‘yes’ to formally start the inquiry, but I don't think it requires that vote,” Khanna told reporters on Capitol Hill last month.

“Well, I support Nadler. I support the impeachment inquiry,” he told MSNBC last month, referring to House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold NadlerJerrold (Jerry) Lewis NadlerHouse to vote on bill to ensure citizenship for children of overseas service members As impeachment goes public, forget 'conventional wisdom' What this 'impeachment' is really about — and it's not the Constitution MORE (D-N.Y.).

But he is not actually calling for a literal inquiry that requires a vote of the House and has provided vocal support for Pelosi’s approach, giving cover to the Speaker from liberals who want her to be more aggressive.

A spokesperson said it is a correct characterization that he is not part of the group calling for an impeachment inquiry to be opened.

4. Rep. Richard NealRichard Edmund NealKrystal Ball accuses Democrats of having 'zero moral authority' amid impeachment inquiry House Democrats object to giving Trump notice before seeking NY tax returns On The Money: Trump appeals to Supreme Court to keep tax returns from NY prosecutors | Pelosi says deal on new NAFTA 'imminent' | Mnuchin downplays shutdown threat | Trump hits Fed after Walmart boasts strong earnings MORE (D-Mass.)

Neal, like a number of other committee chairs, has not come out in support of impeachment despite pressure from the left and a primary challenge.

Holyoke, Mass., Mayor Alex Morse is running against Neal on the issue of impeachment while grassroots groups hit him for his stance.

Neal and other chairs who aren’t backing impeachment are showing loyalty and support to Pelosi, making their stance significant.

5. Rep. Gregory MeeksGregory Weldon MeeksCNN: Biden likened Clinton impeachment to 'partisan lynching' in 1998 House Democrat urges anti-Trump resistance within administration to come 'out of the shadows' Ten notable Democrats who do not favor impeachment MORE (D-N.Y.)

Meeks says he favors removing Trump but wants to do it in a cautious way.

He suggests it would do little good to impeach Trump if there is not going to be a conviction, something that would require 67 votes in the GOP-controlled Senate.

“As a former Assistant District Attorney, I understand the difference between an indictment and a conviction,” Meeks said in a statement to The Hill.

He says Democrats “should continue to allow every committee, not just the Judiciary Committee, to continue to exercise its constitutional oversight responsibilities. That would allow us to get the evidence that could lead to a conviction, or otherwise demonstrate to the public this President’s culture of corruption so that we remove him through the polls in 2020.”

6. Rep. Frederica WilsonFrederica Patricia WilsonBlack lawmakers condemn Trump's 'lynching' remarks Ten notable Democrats who do not favor impeachment Assault weapons ban picks up steam in Congress MORE (D-Fla.)

Wilson is another black lawmaker who is not backing an inquiry, despite Trump’s unpopularity with black voters in general and her own public battles with the president.

Wilson got into it with Trump when she was listening in on a condolence call the president made to the widow of Sgt. La David Johnson, one of the U.S. Green Berets killed in an ambush in Niger in October 2017. Trump said during that call that Johnson “knew what he signed up for,” according to Wilson, who made the remarks public.

“That is not what you say to a grieving widow, a woman who just learned that her husband cannot have an open casket funeral,” said Wilson, whose revelation led to a days-long controversy.

Trump called her “wacky” and accused her of lying.

Also notable is that a majority of Democratic lawmakers from Florida, a key state in the 2020 race, have not backed impeachment.

7. Rep. Terri SewellTerrycina (Terri) Andrea SewellYovanovitch: It's been a 'very, very difficult time' House to take up voting rights, government funding this month Democrats ramp up oversight efforts over 'opportunity zone' incentive MORE (D-Ala.)

Sewell is the only House Democrat in Alabama, and she has not voiced support for impeachment.

She represents a district that voted overwhelmingly for Democratic presidential nominee Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonGOP divided over impeachment trial strategy 'Too Far Left' hashtag trends on Twitter Resistance or unhinged behavior? Partisan hatred reaches Trump's family MORE in 2016. Trump easily won the state, and the districts surrounding Sewell’s are strong Republican footholds.

Sewell, a member of both the Congressional Black Caucus and the House Intelligence Committee, has called for the House to focus on its investigations before moving toward impeachment.

“While nothing is off the table, I believe the relevant committees must continue to investigate before moving to impeachment proceedings,” Sewell said in a statement.

8. Rep. Marcy KapturMarcia (Marcy) Carolyn KapturThe National World War II Memorial is a grateful remembrance — don't let it fall apart A better way to reduce student loan debt GOP lawmakers express concerns about Giuliani's work in Ukraine MORE (D-Ohio)

Kaptur, the longest serving woman in the House, is the only Ohio Democrat in the lower chamber to not support impeachment.

Kaptur, a centrist who won her district against a Republican challenger by roughly 37 points, has not shied away from criticizing the president, but she has followed Pelosi’s lead in calling for the focus to be on House investigations.

“Congress must continue to work to find the truth and hold President Trump and his campaign and business associates accountable,” Kaptur said in a statement to Toledo Blade in June.

“Only through thorough investigations by all the committees of jurisdiction will we get at the full truth and the full extent to which America’s interests have been compromised through Russian meddling and people at the highest levels dealing in their own self-interest.”

9. Rep. Daniel LipinskiDaniel William LipinskiDemocrats unveil impeachment procedures The Hill's Campaign Report: Biden camp faces new challenges Booker endorses Lipinski challenger MORE (D-Ill.)

Lipinski, a conservative Democrat who has seen colleagues support his primary rivals, is not backing an impeachment inquiry.

He and Rep. Cheri BustosCheryl (Cheri) Lea BustosThe Hill's 12:30 Report: Pelosi accuses Trump of 'bribery' in Ukraine dealings DCCC adds senior staffers after summer departures DCCC raises more than M in October MORE (Ill.), who leads House Democrats’ campaign arm, are the only two Illinois Democrats not in favor of an inquiry.

Lipinski, who has previously pointed to the public polls that suggest a majority of voters do not support removing the president, warns that jumping into impeachment could backfire.

“Right now, I think the best way to remove President Trump from office is voting him out in the 2020 election,” Lipinski said in a statement to The Hill. “This may change as the work of House committees continue, but if the House impeached the president now, it could backfire because the president would be able to say that he was persecuted by the Democratic House but exonerated by the Senate.”

Lipinski is once again facing a primary race. And while Pelosi has supported him in the past, as she does for all incumbents, his opponent is likely to attack him from the left on issues like impeachment and his conservative views on abortion.

10. Rep. Bobby ScottRobert (Bobby) Cortez ScottEducation Department finalizes new regulations to relax college-accreditation requirements Trump admin gave over million in aid to students at unaccredited for-profit colleges CBO: Pelosi bill to lower drug prices saves Medicare 5 billion MORE (D-Va.)

Scott opposed the GOP effort to impeach President Clinton in 1998 and has not supported the launching of an inquiry against Trump.

The first African American elected to Congress from Virginia since Reconstruction, he would carry sway with members of his caucus and state if he backed an inquiry. His opposition could give cover to vulnerable Democrats in Virginia, such as Reps. Abigail SpanbergerAbigail Davis SpanbergerClub for Growth extends advertising against House Dems over impeachment NRCC campaign prank leads to suspicious package investigation Overnight Health Care: Walden won't seek reelection | Senate Dems to vote this week to overturn Trump ObamaCare moves | Largest children's migrant shelter to close | Vulnerable Republicans balk at drug pricing bill MORE and Elaine LuriaElaine Goodman LuriaLawmakers under pressure to pass benefits fix for military families Pelosi-backed group funding ads for vulnerable Democrats amid impeachment inquiry Mass shootings have hit 158 House districts so far this year MORE.

Mike Lillis contributed.