Ten notable Democrats who do not favor impeachment

Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiREAD: House impeachment managers' trial brief Desperate Democrats badmouth economy even as it booms Pelosi offers message to Trump on Bill Maher show: 'You are impeached forever' MORE (D-Calif.) is facing pressure from a growing number of Democrats to start an impeachment inquiry against President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump's newest Russia adviser, Andrew Peek, leaves post: report Hawley expects McConnell's final impeachment resolution to give White House defense ability to motion to dismiss Trump rips New York City sea wall: 'Costly, foolish' and 'environmentally unfriendly idea' MORE.

The number of Democrats backing an inquiry has steadily grown over the recess, with a majority now endorsing it.

Yet there are a number of influential lawmakers who are not calling for impeachment, showing that Pelosi has allies in the internal caucus debate.

Here are 10 notable Democrats who do not favor impeachment.

1. Rep. Hakeem JeffriesHakeem Sekou JeffriesSunday shows preview: Lawmakers gear up for Senate impeachment trial The Hill's Morning Report - Dems to lay out impeachment case to senators next week Seven things to know about the Trump trial MORE (D-N.Y.)

Jeffries, the possible future Speaker after Pelosi steps down, has not added his support to an inquiry.

The House Democratic Caucus chairman's stance stands out against possible rivals to succeed Pelosi such as Reps. David CicillineDavid Nicola CicillineHillicon Valley: Biden calls for revoking tech legal shield | DHS chief 'fully expects' Russia to try to interfere in 2020 | Smaller companies testify against Big Tech 'monopoly power' Smaller companies testify against Big Tech's 'monopoly power' Living in limbo may end for Liberians in the US MORE (R.I.) and Katherine ClarkKatherine Marlea ClarkDemocrats ramp up calls for war powers vote after Iran strike Nearly all Democrats expected to back articles of impeachment The Hill's Morning Report - Fallout from day one of Trump impeachment hearing MORE (Mass.), who are backing it.

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Jeffries previously voiced support for the 2018 articles of impeachment introduced by Rep. Al GreenAlexander (Al) N. GreenThe Memo: Will Iran crisis sideline impeachment process? Green says House shouldn't hold impeachment articles indefinitely GOP set to make life difficult for Democrats on impeachment MORE (D-Texas), but he has since embraced Pelosi’s view.

That probably doesn’t hurt his relationship with Pelosi, but it will draw criticism from liberal grassroots groups that back impeachment and could also hurt him in a leadership race.

Jeffries says he backs the House Judiciary Committee’s investigations into Trump.

“Mr. Jeffries supports, and is participating in, the House Judiciary Committee investigation, which includes an assessment as to whether the President committed High Crimes & Misdemeanors,” Michael Hardaway, a spokesman for Jeffries, told The Hill in a statement.

2. Rep. John LewisJohn LewisThe Hill's Morning Report — President Trump on trial John Lewis to miss Martin Luther King Jr. Day event On The Money: USMCA vote held up as committees review deal | Trump legislation added .7T to debt: watchdog | 97 percent of CFOs expect downturn | Trump says 'phase two' China deal could come after election MORE (D-Ga.)

Lewis voted to advance impeachment-related bills in the GOP Congress but has not come out in favor of opening an inquiry since Democrats regained their majority.

The civil rights icon is the elder statesman of the Georgia Democratic delegation, which has been unanimous in not backing an inquiry.

If Lewis changed course, it would almost undoubtedly lead others to back an inquiry since he carries enormous sway through the caucus, especially in the Georgia delegation and the Congressional Black Caucus.

3. Rep. Ro KhannaRohit (Ro) KhannaRep. Ro Khanna: You can't claim you're resisting President Trump and hand the Pentagon a blank check Sanders campaign co-chair calls for progressive unity amid senators' fallout The Hill's Morning Report — President Trump on trial MORE (D-Calif.)

Khanna, a leader of the Congressional Progressive Caucus, is a notable progressive not outwardly backing launching into an impeachment inquiry.

He does back the House Judiciary Committee’s investigation, which the panel’s chairman has likened to impeachment, and he appears on whip lists by The Hill and other media outlets as a “yes” on impeachment because he says the panel’s actions essentially represent an inquiry.

“I would vote ‘yes’ to formally start the inquiry, but I don't think it requires that vote,” Khanna told reporters on Capitol Hill last month.

“Well, I support Nadler. I support the impeachment inquiry,” he told MSNBC last month, referring to House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold NadlerJerrold (Jerry) Lewis NadlerMcConnell locks in schedule for start of impeachment trial Pelosi: Trump's impeachment 'cannot be erased' House to vote Wednesday on sending articles of impeachment to Senate MORE (D-N.Y.).

But he is not actually calling for a literal inquiry that requires a vote of the House and has provided vocal support for Pelosi’s approach, giving cover to the Speaker from liberals who want her to be more aggressive.

A spokesperson said it is a correct characterization that he is not part of the group calling for an impeachment inquiry to be opened.

4. Rep. Richard NealRichard Edmund NealTreasury watchdog to investigate Trump opportunity zone program House poised to hand impeachment articles to Senate House to vote Wednesday on sending articles of impeachment to Senate MORE (D-Mass.)

Neal, like a number of other committee chairs, has not come out in support of impeachment despite pressure from the left and a primary challenge.

Holyoke, Mass., Mayor Alex Morse is running against Neal on the issue of impeachment while grassroots groups hit him for his stance.

Neal and other chairs who aren’t backing impeachment are showing loyalty and support to Pelosi, making their stance significant.

5. Rep. Gregory MeeksGregory Weldon MeeksOcasio-Cortez defends decision not to pay dues to House Democratic campaign arm Hillicon Valley: Lawmakers say Facebook deepfake ban falls short | House passes bills to win 5G race | Feds sound alarm on cyberthreat from Iran | Ivanka Trump appearance at tech show sparks backlash House Democrats urge financial regulators to defend against Iranian cyberattacks MORE (D-N.Y.)

Meeks says he favors removing Trump but wants to do it in a cautious way.

He suggests it would do little good to impeach Trump if there is not going to be a conviction, something that would require 67 votes in the GOP-controlled Senate.

“As a former Assistant District Attorney, I understand the difference between an indictment and a conviction,” Meeks said in a statement to The Hill.

He says Democrats “should continue to allow every committee, not just the Judiciary Committee, to continue to exercise its constitutional oversight responsibilities. That would allow us to get the evidence that could lead to a conviction, or otherwise demonstrate to the public this President’s culture of corruption so that we remove him through the polls in 2020.”

6. Rep. Frederica WilsonFrederica Patricia WilsonTeacher's union leader: DeVos is 'a cautionary tale' of presidential impact on public education Democratic lawmaker tears into DeVos: You're 'out to destroy public education' Democrats lash out at DeVos over proposed changes to loan forgiveness plan MORE (D-Fla.)

Wilson is another black lawmaker who is not backing an inquiry, despite Trump’s unpopularity with black voters in general and her own public battles with the president.

Wilson got into it with Trump when she was listening in on a condolence call the president made to the widow of Sgt. La David Johnson, one of the U.S. Green Berets killed in an ambush in Niger in October 2017. Trump said during that call that Johnson “knew what he signed up for,” according to Wilson, who made the remarks public.

“That is not what you say to a grieving widow, a woman who just learned that her husband cannot have an open casket funeral,” said Wilson, whose revelation led to a days-long controversy.

Trump called her “wacky” and accused her of lying.

Also notable is that a majority of Democratic lawmakers from Florida, a key state in the 2020 race, have not backed impeachment.

7. Rep. Terri SewellTerrycina (Terri) Andrea SewellBiden gains endorsement from Alabama's lone Democratic House rep House panel advances Trump's new NAFTA Senate must take up Voting Rights Advancement Act without delay MORE (D-Ala.)

Sewell is the only House Democrat in Alabama, and she has not voiced support for impeachment.

She represents a district that voted overwhelmingly for Democratic presidential nominee Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham Clinton Democrats plot new approach to win over rural voters The Memo: Sanders-Warren battle could reshape Democratic primary Rosenstein says he authorized release of Strzok-Page texts MORE in 2016. Trump easily won the state, and the districts surrounding Sewell’s are strong Republican footholds.

Sewell, a member of both the Congressional Black Caucus and the House Intelligence Committee, has called for the House to focus on its investigations before moving toward impeachment.

“While nothing is off the table, I believe the relevant committees must continue to investigate before moving to impeachment proceedings,” Sewell said in a statement.

8. Rep. Marcy KapturMarcia (Marcy) Carolyn KapturAppropriators face crucial weekend to reach deal Congress races to beat deadline on shutdown Overnight Defense: Trump clashes with Macron at NATO summit | House impeachment report says Trump abused power | Top Dem scolds military leaders on Trump intervention in war crimes cases MORE (D-Ohio)

Kaptur, the longest serving woman in the House, is the only Ohio Democrat in the lower chamber to not support impeachment.

Kaptur, a centrist who won her district against a Republican challenger by roughly 37 points, has not shied away from criticizing the president, but she has followed Pelosi’s lead in calling for the focus to be on House investigations.

“Congress must continue to work to find the truth and hold President Trump and his campaign and business associates accountable,” Kaptur said in a statement to Toledo Blade in June.

“Only through thorough investigations by all the committees of jurisdiction will we get at the full truth and the full extent to which America’s interests have been compromised through Russian meddling and people at the highest levels dealing in their own self-interest.”

9. Rep. Daniel LipinskiDaniel William LipinskiMore than 200 lawmakers urge Supreme Court to 'reconsider' Roe v. Wade Democratic group to only endorse attorney general candidates who back abortion rights Democrats unveil impeachment procedures MORE (D-Ill.)

Lipinski, a conservative Democrat who has seen colleagues support his primary rivals, is not backing an impeachment inquiry.

He and Rep. Cheri BustosCheryl (Cheri) Lea Bustos Democrats plot new approach to win over rural voters The Hill's Campaign Report: Sanders, Warren feud rattles Democrats House Democrats launch effort to register minority voters in key districts MORE (Ill.), who leads House Democrats’ campaign arm, are the only two Illinois Democrats not in favor of an inquiry.

Lipinski, who has previously pointed to the public polls that suggest a majority of voters do not support removing the president, warns that jumping into impeachment could backfire.

“Right now, I think the best way to remove President Trump from office is voting him out in the 2020 election,” Lipinski said in a statement to The Hill. “This may change as the work of House committees continue, but if the House impeached the president now, it could backfire because the president would be able to say that he was persecuted by the Democratic House but exonerated by the Senate.”

Lipinski is once again facing a primary race. And while Pelosi has supported him in the past, as she does for all incumbents, his opponent is likely to attack him from the left on issues like impeachment and his conservative views on abortion.

10. Rep. Bobby ScottRobert (Bobby) Cortez ScottHoyer: Democratic chairmen trying to bridge divide on surprise medical bills To support today's students, Congress must strengthen oversight of colleges Democratic lawmaker tears into DeVos: You're 'out to destroy public education' MORE (D-Va.)

Scott opposed the GOP effort to impeach President Clinton in 1998 and has not supported the launching of an inquiry against Trump.

The first African American elected to Congress from Virginia since Reconstruction, he would carry sway with members of his caucus and state if he backed an inquiry. His opposition could give cover to vulnerable Democrats in Virginia, such as Reps. Abigail SpanbergerAbigail Davis SpanbergerHouse Democrats launch effort to register minority voters in key districts House passes bills to gain upper hand in race to 5G The biggest political upsets of the decade MORE and Elaine LuriaElaine Goodman LuriaLawmakers warn Pentagon against reduction of US forces in Africa Tenth Congressional Black Caucus member backs Biden 2 Democrats say they voted against war powers resolution 'because it merely restated existing law' MORE.

Mike Lillis contributed.