Rosenstein, Sessions discussed firing Comey in late 2016 or early 2017: FBI notes

Former Deputy Attorney General Rod RosensteinRod RosensteinDOJ kept investigators from completing probe of Trump ties to Russia: report Five takeaways from final Senate Intel Russia report FBI officials hid copies of Russia probe documents fearing Trump interference: book MORE reportedly said that he discussed the firing of former FBI Director James ComeyJames Brien ComeyDemocrats fear Russia interference could spoil bid to retake Senate Book: FBI sex crimes investigator helped trigger October 2016 public probe of Clinton emails Trump jabs at FBI director over testimony on Russia, antifa MORE with former Attorney General Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsGOP set to release controversial Biden report Trump's policies on refugees are as simple as ABCs Ocasio-Cortez, Velázquez call for convention to decide Puerto Rico status MORE in late 2016 or early 2017, according to a new batch of documents released in relation to former special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) MuellerCNN's Toobin warns McCabe is in 'perilous condition' with emboldened Trump CNN anchor rips Trump over Stone while evoking Clinton-Lynch tarmac meeting The Hill's 12:30 Report: New Hampshire fallout MORE's investigation into election interference.

The documents, released due to a CNN and BuzzFeed lawsuit, totaled 295 pages of witness memoranda and notes from FBI interviews that were part of the special counsel's probe.

President TrumpDonald John TrumpBubba Wallace to be driver of Michael Jordan, Denny Hamlin NASCAR team Graham: GOP will confirm Trump's Supreme Court nominee before the election Southwest Airlines, unions call for six-month extension of government aid MORE fired Comey in 2017, saying that he was acting on recommendations from Sessions and Rosenstein. Mueller's probe began in response to Comey's dismissal. 

ADVERTISEMENT

Rosenstein said that he believed Comey's statements on former Secretary of State Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonJoe Biden looks to expand election battleground into Trump country Biden leads Trump by 12 points among Catholic voters: poll The Hill's Campaign Report: Biden goes on offense MORE went against Justice Department rules and said he had contacted "a few people" as possible candidates for Comey's job, according to the documents. 

He also reportedly told FBI interviewers that he was "angry, ashamed, horrified and embarrassed" by the White House's handling of Comey's firing. 

He said he appointed Mueller over concerns about public perception, according to the news outlets.

Rosenstein reportedly said he was surprised that the White House portrayed Comey's firing as his idea. He added that the portrayal of the firing was "inconsistent with my experience and personal knowledge," the news outlets reported. 

Mueller's report, released earlier this year, said that Comey's firing was one of 10 possible instances of obstruction of justice by President Trump. The president has denied wrongdoing and regularly referred to the special counsel investigation as a "witch hunt" and a "hoax." 

The documents released Monday were the second set of released interview notes in the CNN and BuzzFeed lawsuit.