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Bolton book alleges Trump tied Ukraine aid freeze to Biden investigations: NYT

Former national security adviser John BoltonJohn BoltonUS drops lawsuit, closes probe over Bolton book John Bolton: Biden-Putin meeting 'premature' Republicans request documents on Kerry's security clearance process MORE reportedly claims in his as yet unpublished memoir that President TrumpDonald TrumpChinese apps could face subpoenas, bans under Biden executive order: report Kim says North Korea needs to be 'prepared' for 'confrontation' with US Ex-Colorado GOP chair accused of stealing more than 0K from pro-Trump PAC MORE sought to tie hundreds of millions of dollars in aid to Ukraine to his requests for the country's leaders to investigate former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenChinese apps could face subpoenas, bans under Biden executive order: report OVERNIGHT ENERGY:  EPA announces new clean air advisors after firing Trump appointees |  Senate confirms Biden pick for No. 2 role at Interior | Watchdog: Bureau of Land Management saw messaging failures, understaffing during pandemic Poll: Majority back blanket student loan forgiveness MORE and his son Hunter Biden.

Multiple sources familiar with Bolton's book told The New York Times that he writes that President Trump personally told him that $391 million in aid to Ukraine should be frozen until Ukrainian officials announced the investigations, including one into the Democratic National Committee.

The book, which does not have a publication date as of yet, has been submitted to the White House for review. White House officials did not immediately return a request for comment from The Hill on the report.

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An attorney for President Trump, Rudy GiulianiRudy GiulianiMo Brooks accuses Swalwell attorney who served papers on his wife of trespassing GOP's Stefanik defends Trump DOJ secret subpoenas Trump, allies pressured DOJ to back election claims, documents show MORE, responded in a statement obtained by ABC News: "I used to like and respect John, and tell people they were wrong about how irresponsible he was. I was wrong."

"He never once expressed concern to me. If he had confronted me, I could have explained it to him.....He wasn’t man enough to just ask and instead makes false and irresponsible barges to write a book about his failed career."

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The report comes as the Senate has debated for days over whether to allow witnesses in Trump's ongoing impeachment trial beyond those who spoke to House investigators in past months. 

Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerChuck SchumerFive takeaways on the Supreme Court's Obamacare decision Senate confirms Chris Inglis as first White House cyber czar Schumer vows to only pass infrastructure package that is 'a strong, bold climate bill' MORE (D-N.Y.), who has pressed Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellMcConnell shoots down Manchin's voting compromise Environmental groups urge congressional leaders to leave climate provisions in infrastructure package Loeffler meets with McConnell amid speculation of another Senate run MORE (R-Ky.) to allow such witnesses to testify, reiterated his demand following news of Bolton's allegations.

"John Bolton has the evidence," he tweeted. "It’s up to four Senate Republicans to ensure that John Bolton, Mick MulvaneyMick MulvaneyHeadhunters having hard time finding jobs for former Trump officials: report Trump holdovers are denying Social Security benefits to the hardest working Americans Mulvaney calls Trump's comments on Capitol riot 'manifestly false' MORE, and the others with direct knowledge of President Trump’s actions testify in the Senate trial."

Bolton's lawyer confirmed the authenticity of the Times's report in a tweet, writing that he regretted that excerpts had been leaked during the classification and review process.

Bolton left the White House last year, with the president and his former aide disagreeing publicly at the time over whether he had been fired or resigned. The claim in his upcoming book revealed Sunday directly contradicts statements from Trump and other administration officials who have denied that aid to Ukraine was ever tied to the president's efforts to convince Ukraine's president to open investigations.