National Security

CIA officer evacuated from Serbia in possible 'Havana syndrome' case: report

A CIA officer was reportedly evacuated from Serbia in a possible case of so-called Havana syndrome after suffering serious injuries that were in line with the mysterious illness.

The Wall Street Journal, citing current and former U.S. officials, reported that the incident in Serbia, which occurred in recent weeks, is the latest in a string of such incidents caused by an unknown source and affecting American diplomats and intelligence officers.

Government officials and scientists reportedly believe the symptoms are cased by a type of directed-energy source and include dizziness, memory loss and other issues, according to the Journal.

The number of suspected cases is increasing and causing concern among intelligence officials.

A member of CIA Director William Burns's team, who was traveling with him to India earlier this month, reported symptoms that were consistent with Havana syndrome, the first documented instances of which occurred in the Cuban capital, and had to receive medical attention once back in the U.S.

In August, Vice President Harris's trip to Vietnam was delayed because at least two U.S. diplomats in Vietnam had to be evacuated because of reported incidents involving Havana syndrome.

A CIA spokesperson, in a statement to The Hill last week, said the agency does not comment on specific incidents or officers.

"We have protocols in place for when individuals report possible anomalous health incidents that include receiving appropriate medical treatment," the spokesperson added.

The spokesperson also said Burns "has made it a top priority to ensure officers get the care they need and that we get to the bottom of this."

A doctor has been tapped to lead efforts on caring for affected individuals and the CIA has tripled the number of medical staff focused on anomalous health incidents. It has also strengthened efforts to recognize the origins of the incidents, the spokesperson said.

"We will keep doing everything we can to protect our officers," the spokesperson said.

In July, NBC News wrote that up to 200 Americans have reported possible symptoms of Havana syndrome.

This story was updated at 5:59 p.m.

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