Top Russia probe Republican: It's 'clear' Putin tried to hurt Hillary

Top Russia probe Republican: It's 'clear' Putin tried to hurt Hillary
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The top Republican leading the House Intelligence Committee’s investigation into Russian interference said Tuesday that the committee took issue with how the intelligence community reached the conclusion that Russian President Vladimir Putin wanted to help President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump rallies in Nevada amid Supreme Court flurry: 'We're gonna get Brett' Trump: 'Good news' that Obama is campaigning again Trump boosts Heller, hammers 'Wacky Jacky' opponent in Nevada MORE win the election — not the conclusion itself.

The group of intelligence officials who crafted the government’s official assessment of Russian interference in the U.S. election, Rep. Mike ConawayKenneth (Mike) Michael ConawayRussia probe accelerates political prospects for House Intel Dems Congress prepares to punt biggest political battles until after midterms Gowdy: House Intel panel should release all transcripts from Russia probe MORE (R-Texas) said, did not meet the appropriate standards to make the determination of Putin’s preference.

But, he told reporters, “it was clear [Putin] was trying to hurt Hillary [Clinton].”

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“The issue we have is with the analytic tradecraft,” he said. “Everyone gets to make their own mind whether or not they are trying to hurt Hillary or help Trump — whatever it is, it is kind of the glass half full, glass half empty depending how you look at it.”

Conaway announced the end of the committee’s probe on Monday afternoon and laid out a number of the top-line conclusions reached by GOP members in their initial report.

Among those conclusions, Conaway said, will be an assertion that investigators “couldn’t establish the same conclusion that the CIA did that [the Russians] specifically wanted to help Trump.”

The report will also assert that there is no evidence of collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia, Conaway said. 

The announcement was met with a triumphant response from President Trump.

“The House Intelligence Committee has, after a 14 month long in-depth investigation, found no evidence of collusion or coordination between the Trump campaign and Russia to influence the 2016 presidential election,” he tweeted, in all caps.

But a number of committee Republicans appeared to parse Conaway’s statement about Putin’s preferences by Tuesday afternoon.

Rep. Trey GowdyHarold (Trey) Watson GowdyGowdy requests FEMA administrator’s travel records amid allegations Nunes: Russia probe documents should be released before election Gowdy: House Intel panel should release all transcripts from Russia probe MORE (R-S.C.), who helped Conaway lead the probe, issued a statement claiming that “it is clear, based on the evidence, Russia had disdain for Secretary Clinton and was motivated in whole or in part by a desire to harm her candidacy or undermine her Presidency had she prevailed.” 

Asked by CNN’s Erin Burnett if he agreed with the intelligence community’s assessment that Putin explicitly wanted to help Trump, Rep. Tom RooneyThomas (Tom) Joseph RooneySenate panel postpones election security bill markup over lack of GOP support Hillicon Valley: FBI fires Strzok after anti-Trump tweets | Trump signs defense bill with cyber war policy | Google under scrutiny over location data | Sinclair's troubles may just be beginning | Tech to ease health data access | Netflix CFO to step down House Intel lawmakers introduce bipartisan election security bill MORE (R-Fla.) said, “I believe there's evidence of everything that you just said.” 

Conaway on Monday declined to set a timeline for the public release of the House report, which must first be sent back to the intelligence community to be scrubbed for classified information.

Democrats received access to the document on Tuesday for review.

They argue that Republicans are closing down the probe prematurely and ignoring important lines of inquiry into possible collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia.