Good morning tech

Good morning!

A photo of Federal Communications Commission (FCC) Chairman Julius Genachowski greeted Yahoo News readers as they woke up Thursday, along with a bevy of commentary on a major FCC vote today that could significantly alter how Washington oversees AT&T, Comcast, Verizon and other broadband service providers.

The much-anticipated vote by the five FCC commissioners could pave the way for the agency to boost its authority over broadband services. Interest groups squeaked in with their final two cents on Genachowski's proposal, which follows an April appeals court decision that may have undercut the FCC's legal authority to act on key agenda items, including net neutrality rules and the expansion of broadband access. 

Genachowski's proposal, in a nutshell: 

• RECLASSIFY: Place broadband service under "Title II" of the amended 1996 Communications Act, moving it from under the more lightly-regulated "Title I" umbrella. Title II currently regulates telephone services. 

• FORBEAR: Legally prohibit the FCC from imposing Title II's most onerous provisions, including price controls. This is meant to curb concerns about overregulation of broadband.

Here's what interest groups said directly ahead of the vote:

AGAINST:

-AT&T's Paul Mancini raises concerns that future FCC regulators will attempt to "unforbear," imposing Title II's most onerous regulations.   

-Rep. Fred Upton (R-Mich.) reiterated his gripes with the plan on Wednesday, noting that it has "overwhelming opposition within [Congress]." He continues, "The FCC must stand down from pursuing a course unauthorized and opposed by Congress, and should wait for further guidance from the body that has the legal authority in question before moving forward and adopting any new rules."

IN FAVOR:

-The Open Internet Coalition, which includes Google, called the chairman's plan a "common-sense, narrowly drawn ‘third-way’ approach that if adopted, will allow the Commission to help extend high-speed broadband Internet access to all Americans, and make sure consumer choice over broadband Internet service is protected."

-Senate Democrats are circulating a letter that is supportive of the plan, stressing that the proposal is about more than just net neutrality.

WHO, WHERE

DALE HATFIELD — still fresh in his new position as arbiter extraordinaire for Google, AT&T et al. — JAMES BARNETT JR., CHARLES DOWD and STEVE ZIPPERSTEIN will be in the Rayburn Building today to talk about broadband for first responders. 

GREGG HARTLEY is on the Hill today for One Laptop Per Child

VIVEK KUNDRA, JON PEHA, JULIANA GRUENWALD, PHIL BOND, JIM DUFFY, ELIZA KRIGMAN, CHRIS HANSEN, DAVID WENNERGREN and HANK STEININGER attended TechAmerica's Technology and Government awards dinner Wednesday night. 

MICHAEL GALLAGHER is in Los Angeles for the Electronic Entertainment Expo. 

PETER CLEVELAND and FRED HUMPHRIES are on The Hill's list of 2010's top lobbyists released today. Others who have been on the list are JOSH ACKIL, NICK ALLARD, ALAN DAVIDSON, MATT GELMAN, STEVEN CORTESE, GREGG HARTLEY, PETER JACOBY, JOEL JANKOWSKY, STEVE LARGENT, RALPH HELLMANN, MELISSA MAXFIELD, WALTER MCCORMICK, KYLE MCSLARROW, JIM GREENWOOD, MATT TANIELIAN, STEVE UBL and HOWARD WOOLLEY.

VINT CERF and ROGER EBERT were given special achievement honors this week at the Webby Awards in New York City. 

What are you following today? E-mail sjerome@thehill.com.

SAID

"It doesn't even matter what you think. You know why? Cause I'm famous. I am on every major operating system since Microsoft Bob. I'm in your signs. I'm in your browsers. I'm in your instant messengers. I'm not just a font. I am a force of nature."

-Comic Sans defends himself as "the best thing to happen to typography since Johannes Gutenberg" in the face of speculation that he is a "stupid…immature…malformed, pathetic excuse for a font." A McSweeney's Short Imagined Monologue, quoted with Comic Sans' swears cropped out. (h/t LH)

SCHEDULED

…10 a.m. House Energy and Commerce Communications subcommittee hearing on broadband for first responders. 2322 Rayburn House Office Building. 

…10:30 a.m. FCC open meeting. 

FOR THE WATERCOOLER

THE SPY WHO WIRED ME: IT managers are being asked to spend an increasing amount of their time monitoring the work habits of employees, according to a ComputerWorld report. A professor estimates that it could constitute about 20 percent of work time for IT guys. IT managers may be checking which websites personnel visit or even using secretly-installed software such as SpectorSoft to record e-mails, chats, searches, programs run, files transferred and everything else.