Senate's flip could ease path to NSA reform

The looming Republican takeover of the Senate could boost the efforts of civil libertarians and tech companies hoping to rein the National Security Agency this year.
 
Sen. Patrick LeahyPatrick Joseph LeahyTop Senate Dem to Trump: It would be a 'grave mistake' to follow in Richard Nixon's footsteps Booker takes early lead in 2020 endorsements Hillicon Valley: Mueller delivers report, ending investigation | FEMA exposed info of 2.3M disaster survivors | Facebook asks judge to toss DC privacy lawsuit | Trump picks his first CTO | FCC settles lawsuit over net neutrality records MORE’s (D-Vt.) USA Freedom Act has long faced an uphill battle in the Senate, yet Republicans have some incentive to deal with the issue in the upcoming lame-duck session, rather than risk exposing a rift within the party after the GOP takes control.

“I think that the election results highlight the need and, from the Republican Party’s perspective, the desirability of getting USA Freedom across the finish line in the lame duck in order to avoid a potentially ugly inter-party dispute over NSA and surveillance reform next year,” said Kevin Bankston, the policy director at the New America Foundation’s Open Technology Institute.

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The USA Freedom Act seeks to end the NSA’s bulk collection of Americans’ phone records, the most controversial program revealed by Edward Snowden last summer. The bill would require that agents obtain an order from the secretive Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court before searching through the records held by private phone companies.
 
It would also make structural changes to the court and give companies additional ways to report how much information they hand over to the government, a top priority for the tech sector.
 
The bill has an uncertain path forward. It has been held up for several months over negotiations on measures such as the creation of a new panel of civil liberties advocates on the court, and there are few signs of legislators bridging that divide.
 
Lawmakers have to act at some point soon, however.
 
Without reauthorization, the NSA’s phone records program will expire in June, a scenario that intelligence agency officials have said would devastate their ability to track terrorists. The biggest critics of the spy agency have promised to oppose a blanket reauthorization of the law.
 
Not acting now could set the stage for a major showdown on U.S. spying next spring.
 
While potential 2016 presidential candidates Sens. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulHillicon Valley: Mueller delivers report, ending investigation | FEMA exposed info of 2.3M disaster survivors | Facebook asks judge to toss DC privacy lawsuit | Trump picks his first CTO | FCC settles lawsuit over net neutrality records Transparency advocate says government agencies face 'use it or lose it' spending Republicans need solutions on environment too MORE (R-Ky.) and Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzCountdown clock is on for Mueller conclusions Ex-Clinton aide: Dems should make 2020 'about integrity' Cruz: House 'fully intends' to impeach Trump MORE (R-Texas) — who is a cosponsor of the USA Freedom Act — might relish the opportunity to advertise their civil liberties bona fides on the Senate floor just months before the campaign season gets formally under way, it’s easy to see how Republican leaders would want to avoid showing a split within the party.
 
The fight could also eat up valuable floor space early in Republicans’ time controlling both chambers of Congress.

“It might be in the party’s interest not to divide themselves early on into next Congress and get this out of the way, so they can turn to some of their other priority agenda items,” said one lobbyist working to pass the bill.
 
A second lobbyist working on the issue said passing the bill this year “would make it a lot easier to start with a clean slate” in 2015.
 
Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellLessons from the 1999 U.S. military intervention in Kosovo Five things to watch as AIPAC conference kicks off Romney helps GOP look for new path on climate change MORE (R-Ky.) said on Wednesday that there are multiple issues he would like to take care of this year, though he did not specifically mention the USA Freedom Act.
 
“The Senate hasn’t been doing anything,” he added. “So, there’s a whole lot of unfinished business sitting there, some of which it might be advantageous to get out of the way — Democrats may want to do it, and we may want to do it — in order to clear off some of the necessary work that’s just simply been undone in the dysfunctional Senate.”
 
Leahy, for one, has made the USA Freedom Act his main priority for the rest of the year, and he seems unlikely to yield in his final few weeks as chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee.

Whatever happens with the USA Freedom Act, however, Republican control of the Senate is likely to scuttle any more aggressive surveillance reforms in the immediate future.
 
Sen. Mark UdallMark Emery UdallDenver Post editorial board says Gardner endorsement was 'mistake' Gardner gets latest Democratic challenge from former state senator Setting the record straight about No Labels MORE (D-Colo.), one of the strongest advocates of tougher reforms to the NSA, lost his reelection race to Rep. Cory GardnerCory Scott GardnerHow to stand out in the crowd: Kirsten Gillibrand needs to find her niche Overnight Defense: Trump to reverse North Korea sanctions imposed by Treasury | Move sparks confusion | White House says all ISIS territory in Syria retaken | US-backed forces report heavy fighting | Two US troops killed in Afghanistan Overnight Health Care: CDC pushes for expanding HIV testing, treatment | Dem group launches ads attacking Trump on Medicare, Medicaid cuts | Hospitals, insurers spar over surprise bills | O'Rourke under pressure from left on Medicare for all MORE (R-Colo.) on Tuesday night, depriving spy critics of a core voice on the Senate Intelligence Committee. While Gardner has praised Udall’s work on the issue, he has been a much less passionate critic.
 
Rep. Tom CottonThomas (Tom) Bryant CottonSenate rejects border declaration in major rebuke of Trump Hillicon Valley: Doctors press tech to crack down on anti-vax content | Facebook, Instagram suffer widespread outages | Spotify hits Apple with antitrust complaint | FCC rejects calls to delay 5G auction Senate votes to confirm Neomi Rao to appeals court MORE (R-Ark.), who easily unseated Sen. Mark PryorMark Lunsford PryorMedicaid rollback looms for GOP senators in 2020 Cotton pitches anti-Democrat message to SC delegation Ex-Sen. Kay Hagan joins lobby firm MORE (R-Ark.) on Tuesday, has been a defender of the NSA in the past and is expected to join the ranks of hawks in the chamber.
 
The new makeup of the Intelligence Committee will also change next year, in a shift that many civil libertarians said wouldn’t be good for their issues.
 
The panel’s current top Republican, Sen. Saxby ChamblissClarence (Saxby) Saxby ChamblissEx-House Intel chair: Intel panel is wrong forum to investigate Trump's finances The Hill's Morning Report - Trump budget reignites border security fight Senate buzz grows for Abrams after speech electrifies Dems MORE (Ga.), is retiring this year, opening the door for Sen. Richard BurrRichard Mauze BurrTrump, Congress brace for Mueller findings GOP's Tillis comes under pressure for taking on Trump Warner says there are 'enormous amounts of evidence' suggesting Russia collusion MORE (R-N.C.) to assume the mantle as chairman of the powerful spy panel.
 
He has widely been seen to me a more supportive ally of the NSA, CIA and other spy agencies.
 
Burr has “zero intention of exercising any oversight into the intelligence community,” warned Marcy Wheeler, a prominent liberal critic of American spying, in a blog post on Wednesday.