Zuckerberg group urges 'big and bold' action on immigration reform

The pro-immigration group co-founded by Mark Zuckerberg is urging "big and bold" executive action from President Obama — and it wants lawmakers clamoring for it, too.

FWD.us President Todd Schulte called on supporters to push for immediate action by calling members of Congress and sharing their stories. 

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"We have a real opportunity over the weeks ahead to push the President to take big and bold action to make immediate fixes to our immigration system," he wrote in a message to supporters Wednesday night. “Newly elected Republicans and Democrats alike have vowed to support reform in 2015, but we need significant action on immigration this year."

The technology community has pushed for high-tech visa reform in Obama's plan, while also looking to ease the threat of deportation more broadly. 

"Millions of children woke up this morning afraid that their family could be torn apart at any time,” he said. “Entrepreneurs and foreign students across the country don’t have the opportunity to build their companies and use their degrees in America. These communities need action now."

Like Obama, FWD.us and other pro-immigration groups have urged for comprehensive legislation.

"While these executive actions are a step in the right direction, what our country absolutely needs is a legislative solution," Schulte said. "That is the only way to achieve permanent reform."

During a press conference on Tuesday, the president reiterated he would act by the end of the year. Addressing critics of his yet-to-be-detailed plan, he said any executive action could be rescinded if a bill hits his desk. 

"So before the end of the year, we're going to take whatever lawful actions that I can take, that I believe will improve the functioning of our immigration system, that will allow us to surge additional resources to the border, where I think the vast majority of Americans have the deepest concern," he said. 

During a town hall in California last month, Obama hinted that one step he could take is reforming the H-1B visa system "that is often use by tech companies."