Lieberman warns July is deadline for cybersecurity bill

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Lieberman's bill, which is co-sponsored by Sen. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsOvernight Health Care: Insurance lobby chief calls Biden, Sanders health plans 'similarly bad' | Trump officials appeal drug price disclosure ruling | Study finds 1 in 7 people ration diabetes medicine due to cost Collins downplays 2020 threat: 'Confident' reelection would go well if she runs Cook Political Report moves Susan Collins Senate race to 'toss up' MORE (R-Maine), would encourage private companies to share information about cyber threats with one another and with the government. The bill would also empower the Homeland Security Department to set minimum cybersecurity standards for critical infrastructure systems, such as electrical grids and gas pipelines.

Supporters of the legislation, including the White House, say the mandatory standards are necessary to protect vital systems from attack.

In his speech on Wednesday, Lieberman entered into the record a letter from a bipartisan group of former national security officials calling for critical infrastructure protections. The officials warned that without the protections, the nation is at risk of suffering a "cyber 9/11."

But many Republicans, including Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainCindy McCain says no one in Republican Party carries 'voice of reason' after husband's death Anti-gun violence organization endorses Kelly's Senate bid McCain's family, McCain Institute to promote #ActsOfCivility in marking first anniversary of senator's death MORE (Ariz.), argue the mandates would unnecessarily burden businesses. They say the government should only enable the private sector to protects its systems, and not dictate which security measures to take.

Sens. Sheldon WhitehouseSheldon WhitehouseSenate Democrats push Trump to permanently shutter migrant detention facility To cash in on innovation, remove market barriers for advanced energy technologies Democrats give cold shoulder to Warren wealth tax MORE (D-R.I.) and Jon Kyl (R-Ariz.) are working on a compromise proposal that would pressure, but not force, critical infrastructure companies to better protect their systems.

In April, the House passed its own cybersecurity bill, the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act (CISPA), which focuses only on voluntary information-sharing and would not mandate any security standards.

In his speech, Lieberman congratulated the House for taking "some initial good steps," but argued that the critical infrastructure protections must be included in the legislation that ultimately becomes law.

He thanked Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidMcConnell rejects Democrats' 'radical movement' to abolish filibuster Harry Reid: 'Decriminalizing border crossings is not something that should be at the top of the list' 2020 Democrats fight to claim Obama's mantle on health care MORE (D-Nev.), who gave his own speech on the Senate floor on Tuesday stressing his support for Lieberman's bill. Lieberman said that Reid has assured him the bill will come up for a vote in July, and he predicted that the bill will have the votes to clear the chamber.

Lieberman has said the cybersecurity bill is his top legislative priority before he retires at the end of the year.