Senate Republicans revamp cybersecurity bill

ADVERTISEMENT

The new version of the legislation, S. 3342, aims to address the concerns of privacy advocates, who had warned that the old bill would give spy agencies access to Americans' private online information.

The Republican senators said their new bill tightens the definition of "cyber threat information" and clarifies that the government cannot use or retain the information for reasons other those specified in the bill. They also said it creates new oversight authorities to protect privacy and civil liberties.

Hutchison said the lawmakers worked closely with interest groups to draft the new version of the bill, and they believe the new Secure IT is a "consensus bill that will significantly advance the security of our government and private sector networks."

“Our bill focuses on giving companies and the government the tools and knowledge they need to protect themselves from cyber threats, and creates new important requirements for government contractors to notify their agencies of significant cyber-attacks to their systems,” she said in a statement.

Importantly, the bill still does not give the government any power to set mandatory security standards for critical infrastructure systems.

The White House and Senate Democrats argue that standards for critical systems, such as electrical grids and gas pipelines, are a necessary part of any cybersecurity legislation. They argue that without mandatory standards, the country will be at risk for a devastating attack that could cost thousands of lives.

A separate bill offered by Sens. Joe Lieberman (I-Conn.) and Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsThe Hill's Morning Report - Trump says no legislation until Dems end probes Collins offering bill to boost battery research as GOP pushes energy 'innovation' Biden says Congress must move to protect abortion rights MORE (R-Maine) would empower the Homeland Security Department to set cybersecurity standards. But Republicans argue security mandates would burden business and do little to improve cybersecurity.

"The key to successfully fighting this threat is not adding more bureaucrats or forcing industries to comply with government red-tape,”  McCain said in a statement. “Instead, we must leverage the ingenuity and innovation of the private sector in partnership with the most effective elements of the federal government to address this emerging threat.” 

In an email, Leslie Phillips, a spokeswoman for Lieberman, said the senator is "encouraged that Republicans recognize the urgency of cybersecurity and looks forward to a lively floor debate."

"He is, however, disappointed that SECURE IT does not address the grave threat of cyber attack against critical infrastructure," she said.

The Secure IT Act is also co-sponsored by Sens. Chuck GrassleyCharles (Chuck) Ernest GrassleyTrump-Pelosi fight threatens drug pricing talks Overnight Health Care — Presented by PCMA — Senators unveil sweeping bipartisan health care package | House lawmakers float Medicare pricing reforms | Dems offer bill to guarantee abortion access Bipartisan senators reveal sweeping health care package MORE (R-Iowa), Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiMurkowski celebrates birthday with electric scooter ride Overnight Energy: Park Service plans to pay full-time staff through entrance fees | Oil companies join blitz for carbon tax | Interior chief takes heat for saying he hasn't 'lost sleep' over climate change Democrats grill Trump Interior chief for saying he hasn't 'lost sleep' over climate change MORE (R-Alaska), Dan CoatsDaniel (Dan) Ray CoatsFive takeaways from Barr's new powers in 'spying' probe Trump declassification move unnerves Democrats Hillicon Valley: Facebook co-founder calls for breaking up company | Facebook pushes back | Experts study 2020 candidates to offset 'deepfake' threat | FCC votes to block China Mobile | Groups, lawmakers accuse Amazon of violating children's privacy MORE (R-Ind.), Ron JohnsonRonald (Ron) Harold JohnsonFrustration boils over with Senate's 'legislative graveyard' Barr throws curveball into Senate GOP 'spying' probe Bipartisan group of senators introduce legislation designed to strengthen cybersecurity of voting systems MORE (R-Wis.) and Richard BurrRichard Mauze BurrFive takeaways from Barr's new powers in 'spying' probe The Hill's Morning Report — After contentious week, Trump heads for Japan Trump Jr. slams Republican committee chairman: 'Too weak to stand up to the Democrats' MORE (R-N.C.).

Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidLobbying World Mitch McConnell is not invincible Seven big decisions facing Biden in 2020 primary MORE (D-Nev.) has said he plans to bring the Lieberman-Collins bill to a vote next month.

Sens. Sheldon WhitehouseSheldon WhitehouseOvernight Energy: Democrats push EPA to collect 4K in 'excessive' Pruitt travel expenses | Greens angered over new rules for rocket fuel chemical | Inslee to join youth climate strikers in Las Vegas Democrats push EPA to collect 4K from Pruitt for 'excessive airfare expenses' Overnight Energy: Democrats ask if EPA chief misled on vehicle emissions | Dem senators want NBC debate focused on climate change | 2020 hopeful John Delaney unveils T climate plan MORE (D-R.I.) and Jon Kyl (R-Ariz.) are working on a compromise that would pressure, but not force, critical infrastructure systems to better protect their systems.

—Updated at 2:10 p.m.