This Week in Tech: Cybersecurity showdown arrives in Senate

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The GOP co-sponsors of Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainMellman: Where are good faith and integrity? GOP senator says Republicans didn't control Senate when they held majority Pence met with silence after mentioning Trump in Munich speech MORE's (R-Ariz.) rival bill, the Secure IT Act, have already made good on their promise to file their measure as a substitute amendment. Those Republican members are also likely to introduce pieces of Secure IT as amendments so that the final product looks more like their bill, which they argue has a higher chance of passing the House.

On Monday, the co-sponsors of the Cybersecurity Act and Secure IT Act, as well as other senators involved in earlier compromise efforts, will continue negotiations on different parts of the bill. While it's unlikely that any sweeping agreement will be reached, the senators might be able to find amendments to Lieberman's bill that both parties can back.

The group began their discussions last week. On Friday, Lieberman and Sens. Dianne FeinsteinDianne Emiel FeinsteinFeinstein says she thinks Biden will run after meeting with him Trump judicial nominee Neomi Rao seeks to clarify past remarks on date rape Bottom Line MORE (D-Calif.) and Chris CoonsChristopher (Chris) Andrew CoonsTrump got in Dem’s face over abortion at private meeting: report Live coverage: Trump delivers State of the Union Actor Chris Evans meets with Democratic senators before State of the Union MORE (D-Del.) met with representatives from the U.S. Chamber of Commerce to go over their concerns with the Cybersecurity Act, specifically the information sharing measures. The Chamber is the most prominent critic of Lieberman's bill, and the group’s opposition carries a lot of weight with GOP members.

Later on Friday, the senators met with Homeland Security Department officials, including Rand BeersRand BeersNational security figures urge Trump to disclose foreign business ties DNC creates cybersecurity board The Hill's 12:30 Report MORE, the under secretary for the department's national protection and programs directorate.

Senators had already filed a raft of amendments to the cybersecurity bill by Friday afternoon. Sens. John McCain (R-Ariz.) and Kay Bailey Hutchison (R-Texas) filed amendments with the Secure IT bill in them. Sen. Patrick LeahyPatrick Joseph LeahyBooker wins 2020 endorsement of every New Jersey Democrat in Congress The Hill's Morning Report - Can Bernie recapture 2016 magic? Leahy endorses Sanders for president MORE (D-Vt.) submitted five amendments that cover areas of data security, privacy and stiffening penalties for cyber crime.

Sens. Al FrankenAlan (Al) Stuart FrankenVirginia can be better than this Harris off to best start among Dems in race, say strategists, donors Virginia scandals pit Democrats against themselves and their message MORE (D-Minn.) and Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.) announced plans last week to file amendments aimed at boosting the privacy protections in the bill. Sen. Daniel Akaka (D-Hawaii) filed an amendment last week that proposes to establish a chief privacy officer in the Office of Management and Budget.

Additionally, Sen. Ron WydenRonald (Ron) Lee WydenOvernight Health Care — Presented by National Taxpayers Union — Top Dems call for end to Medicaid work rules | Chamber launching ad blitz against Trump drug plan | Google offers help to dispose of opioids Top Dems call for end to Medicaid work rules after 18,000 lose coverage in Arkansas Overnight Health Care — Presented by National Taxpayers Union — Drug pricing fight centers on insulin | Florida governor working with Trump to import cheaper drugs | Dems blast proposed ObamaCare changes MORE (D-Ore.) is working on his own set of proposed changes to the bill. Wyden plans on filing his GPS Act as an amendment, which would require police to obtain a warrant before requesting location data from a person's cellphone, laptop or GPS device, except in an emergency. He also plans to file an amendment that would narrow the FISMA reforms in the bill, and another that would state that the international cooperation-related provisions could not be interpreted "to authorize the president to enter into a binding international agreement establishing disciplines on cybersecurity without advice and consent of the Senate," according to a Wyden spokesman.

But even if Lieberman's bill manages to clear the Senate, it faces long odds of emerging from the House intact. GOP House leaders indicate they oppose any legislation to pressure companies to adopt tougher cybersecurity standards.

In other technology news, the Senate, Commerce and Science Transportation Committee will hold a hearing on Wednesday to examine legislation that would allow states to tax online purchases.

Committee Chairman Jay RockefellerJohn (Jay) Davison RockefellerSenate GOP rejects Trump’s call to go big on gun legislation Overnight Tech: Trump nominates Dem to FCC | Facebook pulls suspected baseball gunman's pages | Uber board member resigns after sexist comment Trump nominates former FCC Dem for another term MORE (D-W.Va.) is a co-sponsor of the online tax bill, the Marketplace Fairness Act. The measure is also supported by Sens. Dick DurbinRichard (Dick) Joseph DurbinOvernight Energy: Trump ends talks with California on car emissions | Dems face tough vote on Green New Deal | Climate PAC backing Inslee in possible 2020 run Dems face tough vote on Green New Deal Durbin: Trump pressuring acting AG in Cohen probe is 'no surprise' MORE (D-Ill.), Mike EnziMichael (Mike) Bradley EnziWill Senate GOP try to pass a budget this year? Presumptive benefits to Blue Water Navy veterans are a major win If single payer were really a bargain, supporters like Rep. John Yarmuth would be upfront about its cost MORE (R-Wyo.) and Lamar AlexanderAndrew (Lamar) Lamar AlexanderSenate Dems to introduce resolution blocking Trump's emergency declaration GOP Sen. Collins says she'll back resolution to block Trump's emergency declaration The Hill's 12:30 Report: Trump escalates fight with NY Times MORE (R-Tenn.).

The House Judiciary Committee held a hearing on counterpart sales tax legislation last week.

Under current law, states can only collect sales taxes from retailers that have a physical presence in their state. People who order items online from another state are supposed to declare the purchase on their tax forms, but few do.

The legislation is backed strongly by traditional brick-and-mortar stores, who say the current system gives an unfair advantage to online retailers. Online giant Amazon is also lobbying for the legislation, arguing that a national standard is preferable to a patchwork of state laws. Amazon reportedly has plans to dramatically expand its physical distribution centers, which would make it subject to taxes in many states under current law anyway.

Online auction site eBay and many anti-tax groups oppose the bills, saying they will stifle e-commerce and burden taxpayers.

On Tuesday morning, the Senate Homeland Security and Government Affairs Committee's subcommittee on Oversight of Government Management will hold a hearing to consider whether to update the 1974 Privacy Act, which restricts how the federal government can handle people's personal information.

Subcommittee Chairman Akaka has sponsored a bill, S. 1732, which would implement privacy safeguards and require federal agencies to notify the public in the event of a data breach.

The witnesses will be Mary Ellen Callahan, The Homeland Security Department's chief privacy officer; Greg Long, executive director of the Federal Retirement Thrift Investment Board; Greg Wilshusen, director of information security issues for the Government Accountability Office; Peter Swire, law professor at Ohio State University; Chris Calabrese, legislative counsel for the American Civil Liberties Union; and Paul Rosenzweig, a visiting fellow for The Heritage Foundation.