Clinton vows to enforce 'strong' net neutrality rules

Clinton vows to enforce 'strong' net neutrality rules
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Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonSanders: 'Outrageous' to suggest Gabbard 'is a foreign asset' Clinton attacks on Gabbard become flashpoint in presidential race Saagar Enjeti: Clinton remarks on Gabbard 'shows just how deep the rot in our system goes' MORE is vowing to enforce strong net neutrality rules if she is elected president. 

In a new op-ed, Clinton also promised to beef up antitrust enforcement and endorsed a recent Federal Communications Commission ruling that would override state laws that stifle the buildout of city-run Internet service. 

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“Closing these loopholes and protecting other standards of free and fair competition — like enforcing strong net neutrality rules and preempting state laws that unfairly protect incumbent businesses — will keep more money in consumers’ wallets, enable startups to challenge the status quo, and allow small businesses to thrive,” she wrote in an op-ed in Quartz.

Clinton’s op-ed focuses more broadly on the concentration of big business, arguing that consumers should not be left out of the equation. In addition to the Internet, she also touched on the drug and oil industries. 

She lamented that high-speed Internet prices in the United States are higher, on average, than other major cities around the world. She blamed that on “local monopolies,” where many communities have limited options when picking a broadband provider.

She implicitly referenced new projects such as city-owned fiber networks that have sprung up in dozens of communities, giving customers ultra-fast Internet speeds. Google Fiber has also entered a number of cities, including Kansas City, to offer 1 gigabit speeds. 

“When alternatives do emerge, however, as they have in places like Kansas City, prices go down and speeds go up,” Clinton wrote. 

Clinton also vowed to beef up antitrust enforcement by hiring “aggressive regulators” to review company mergers. 

The cable and wireless industry has seen a slate of consolidation in recent years. Regulators recently rejected a proposed merger between Comcast and Time Warner Cable, while another between DirecTV and AT&T was allowed to go through. 

Charter Communication’s recent plan to acquire Time Warner Cable is now under review.