Senate Republicans: Executive order would solidify divide on cybersecurity

A group of Senate Republicans urged President Obama on Tuesday not to issue an executive order on cybersecurity, arguing that only congressional action can adequately protect the nation's computer systems.

Administration officials have said they began drafting an executive order after Senate Republicans blocked cybersecurity legislation in August. Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano said in a recent congressional hearing that the order is "close to completion." 

In Tuesday's letter, Sens. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainJuan Williams: Biden's promises on women are a big deal Ernst calls for public presidential campaign funds to go to masks, protective equipment President Trump is right — Now's the time for 'all hands on deck' MORE (R-Ariz.), Kay Bailey Hutchison (R-Texas), Dan CoatsDaniel (Dan) Ray CoatsWe weren't ready for a pandemic — imagine a crippling cyberattack GOP presses for swift Ratcliffe confirmation to intel post Experts report recent increase in Chinese group's cyberattacks MORE (R-Ind.), Saxby ChamblissClarence (Saxby) Saxby ChamblissGOP lobbyist tapped for White House legislative affairs The Hill's Morning Report - Gillibrand drops out as number of debaters shrinks Hoekstra emerges as favorite for top intelligence post MORE (R-Ga.), Jon Kyl (R-Ariz.) and Roy BluntRoy Dean BluntHillicon Valley: Apple rolls out coronavirus screening app, website | Pompeo urged to crack down on coronavirus misinformation from China | Senators push FTC on price gouging | Instacart workers threaten strike Lawmakers already planning more coronavirus stimulus after T package Senate Democrats vow to keep pushing for more funds for mail-in voting MORE (R-Mo.) said an executive order would fail to address the nation's cyber vulnerabilities.

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“An issue as far-reaching and complicated as cybersecurity requires all stakeholders to work together to develop an enduring legislative solution through formal consideration and approval by Congress," they wrote. "Yet, rather than build confidence and unity among key stakeholders, an Executive Order will solidify the present divide."

The Cybersecurity Act, which had the support of the White House and Senate Democrats, would have set voluntary cybersecurity standards for operators of critical infrastructure, such as gas pipelines and banks. The bill would have also authorized companies and the government to share information about cyber threats.

Republicans supported the information-sharing provisions, but they worried the security standards would have burdened businesses and done little to improve security. Democrats argued the standards were necessary to ensure that vital systems were safe from attack.

Many of the Republicans who signed Tuesday's letter had pushed for their own cybersecurity bill, the Secure IT Act, which would have focused only on information-sharing.

Of the six Republicans on the letter, only Coats voted for the Cybersecurity Act on the Senate floor.

According to officials familiar with the draft executive order, it would encourage companies to meet cybersecurity standards. Legal experts say that only Congress can enact the information-sharing provisions, which would change existing laws.

"We remain committed to this legislative process and urge you to work with Congress rather than act unilaterally through an Executive Order," the Republicans wrote.

A host of Democrats have urged President Obama to move ahead with the executive order.

Sens. Joe Lieberman (I-Conn.), Jay RockefellerJohn (Jay) Davison RockefellerBottom Line World Health Day: It's time to fight preventable disease Lobbying World MORE (D-W.Va.), Dianne FeinsteinDianne Emiel FeinsteinDemocratic lawmakers demand government stop deporting unaccompanied children DOJ probing stock transactions made by lawmakers ahead of coronavirus crisis: report Lobbying frenzy connected to stimulus sparks backlash MORE (D-Calif.), Barbara MikulskiBarbara Ann MikulskiLobbying World Only four Dem senators have endorsed 2020 candidates Raskin embraces role as constitutional scholar MORE (D-Md.), Chris CoonsChristopher (Chris) Andrew CoonsSenate includes 0M for mail-in voting in coronavirus spending deal Hillicon Valley: Facebook reports huge spike in usage during pandemic | Democrats push for mail-in voting funds in coronavirus stimulus | Trump delays deadline to acquire REAL ID Democrats press for more stimulus funding to boost mail-in voting MORE (D-Del.) and Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.) have all called on the president to issue an order in the light of the Senate's inaction.

Sen. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsGOP presses for swift Ratcliffe confirmation to intel post Campaigns pivot toward health awareness as races sidelined by coronavirus Senate eyes quick exit after vote on coronavirus stimulus package MORE (R-Maine), a key co-sponsor of the Cybersecurity Act, has said she does not support an executive order, but she did not sign the GOP letter.