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Apple chief Tim Cook opposes government backdoor to encryption

Apple chief Tim Cook opposes government backdoor to encryption
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Apple CEO Tim Cook is defending his opposition to providing intelligence agencies with backdoors to access encrypted information on his company’s products.

In the wake of the Paris terrorist attack, in which assailants are believed to have used encrypted devices to avoid government surveillance, politicians and law enforcement agencies have called for measures to prevent tech companies from fully encrypting users’ communications.

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But in an interview conducted prior to the attack, Cook said providing a backdoor to encryption would aid both law-enforcement agencies and the terrorists they are working to stop.

“There have been people that suggest that we should have a backdoor. But the reality is if you put a backdoor in, that backdoor's for everybody, for good guys and bad guys,” Cook said in an interview with “60 Minutes” broadcast on Sunday.

Cook has reiterated his support for encryption since the Nov. 13 attack, which left 130 dead.

He said the choice between privacy and national security is a false one.

“I don’t believe the trade-off here is privacy versus national security,” he said, adding that’s an “overly simplistic view.”

“We’re America. We should have both.”

Several 2016 presidential candidates, including Donald TrumpDonald TrumpHarry Reid reacts to Boehner book excerpt: 'We didn't mince words' Man arrested for allegedly threatening to stab undercover Asian officer in NYC Trump says GOP will take White House in 2024 in prepared speech MORE and Sen. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioHillicon Valley: Amazon wins union election — says 'our employees made the choice' Overnight Defense: Biden proposes 3B defense budget | Criticism comes in from left and right | Pentagon moves toward new screening for extremists The growing threat of China's lawfare MORE (R-Fla.), have advocated measures to help intelligence agencies circumvent encryption.