Handful of Dems break ranks on net neutrality vote

Five House Democrats broke ranks and voted with Republicans on Friday to approve a bill to prevent the Federal Communications Commission from regulating the rates that Internet providers charge for service. 

Any crossovers were striking because the vote was seen as the closest thing to a referendum on the FCC's net neutrality regulations since they were approved on a divided vote at the commission last year.

ADVERTISEMENT

The Democratic yes votes came from Reps. Jim CostaJames (Jim) Manuel CostaFresno congressman calls for Senate to take up gun legislation after deadly mass shooting at football party Overnight Defense: Protests at Trump's NYC Veterans Day speech | House Dems release Pentagon official's deposition transcript | Lawmakers ask Trump to rescind Erdogan invite Bipartisan House members call on Trump to rescind Erdoğan invitation MORE (Calif.), Scott PetersScott H. PetersFreer housing is 'fairer housing' — HUD should tie funding to looser zoning How to kickstart a rapid global warming slowdown Mass shootings have hit 158 House districts so far this year MORE (Calif.), Collin PetersonCollin Clark PetersonHow centrist Dems learned to stop worrying and love impeachment GOP lawmaker says House impeachment rules vote 'doesn't change anything for me' Majority of Americans see impeachment inquiry as fair: poll MORE (Minn.), Kyrsten Sinema (Ariz.) and Albio SiresAlbio B. SiresLawmakers spar over surveillance flight treaty with Russia Overnight Defense: Protests at Trump's NYC Veterans Day speech | House Dems release Pentagon official's deposition transcript | Lawmakers ask Trump to rescind Erdogan invite Bipartisan House members call on Trump to rescind Erdoğan invitation MORE (N.J.).  

All but Sires are Democrats aligning with the Blue Dogs, the New Dem Coalition or both. Both groups are seen as more centrist than the Democratic Party in general. 

Three of the five — Peters, Peterson and Sinema — are in competitive races in 2016, but observers expect them to hold their seats. 

The bill would prevent the FCC from setting or reviewing the prices that Internet service providers charge. The FCC has said it has no intention of regulating those rates under its net neutrality rules. Democrats say the GOP bill would go much further to limit much of the commission's authority. 

The White House vowed to veto the bill if it ever made it to the president's desk.