Handful of Dems break ranks on net neutrality vote

Five House Democrats broke ranks and voted with Republicans on Friday to approve a bill to prevent the Federal Communications Commission from regulating the rates that Internet providers charge for service. 

Any crossovers were striking because the vote was seen as the closest thing to a referendum on the FCC's net neutrality regulations since they were approved on a divided vote at the commission last year.

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The Democratic yes votes came from Reps. Jim CostaJames (Jim) Manuel CostaProposed California maps put incumbents in jeopardy Democrats bullish they'll reach finish line this week Moderate Democrats press for score before vote on Biden package MORE (Calif.), Scott PetersScott H. PetersOvernight Health Care — Presented by Emergent Biosolutions — Pfizer, US strike COVID-19 pill deal CBO: Democrats' package saves about 0B on drug prices Democrats bullish they'll reach finish line this week MORE (Calif.), Collin PetersonCollin Clark Peterson Progressives fight for leverage amid ever-slimming majority Six ways to visualize a divided America On The Trail: The political losers of 2020 MORE (Minn.), Kyrsten SinemaKyrsten SinemaIRS data proves Trump tax cuts benefited middle, working-class Americans most Photos of the Week: Schumer, ASU protest and sea turtles Green groups spend big to promote climate policy MORE (Ariz.) and Albio SiresAlbio B. SiresCountering China's influence in the Caribbean with a second Caribbean Basin Initiative We can't lose sight of Ortega's abuses in Nicaragua Hispanic Caucus requests meeting with private detention center CEOs MORE (N.J.).  

All but Sires are Democrats aligning with the Blue Dogs, the New Dem Coalition or both. Both groups are seen as more centrist than the Democratic Party in general. 

Three of the five — Peters, Peterson and Sinema — are in competitive races in 2016, but observers expect them to hold their seats. 

The bill would prevent the FCC from setting or reviewing the prices that Internet service providers charge. The FCC has said it has no intention of regulating those rates under its net neutrality rules. Democrats say the GOP bill would go much further to limit much of the commission's authority. 

The White House vowed to veto the bill if it ever made it to the president's desk.