McCain open to visa bill in comprehensive immigration package

Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainBiden's sloppy launch may cost him Cindy McCain weighs in on Biden report: 'No intention' of getting involved in race Why did Mueller allow his investigation to continue for two years? MORE (R-Ariz.) said he is open to wrapping a bill that would boost the number of visas available for high-skilled foreign workers into the broad comprehensive immigration framework that was announced on Monday.

A bipartisan group of four senators, including Sen. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioDems plot aggressive post-Mueller moves, beginning with McGahn Senate Republicans tested on Trump support after Mueller Cuban negotiator says Trump's efforts to destabilize Cuba's government will fail MORE (R-Fla.), is set to introduce a stand-alone bill on Tuesday that would significantly increase the cap for H-1B visas for skilled foreign workers, such as computer programmers and engineers.

"We hope that that kind of legislation will fit into the comprehensive immigration reform," McCain said after a press conference at which he and group of senators outlined a framework of principles for immigration legislation. "We'll have to examine it and get the Democrats' view of it and all that, but it's always going to be part of the discussion and part of a comprehensive plan."

McCain said Rubio has always made it clear that any sweeping immigration package should include a high-skilled measure, which is of chief concern to the tech industry.

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Rubio also signed onto the comprehensive immigration framework that was sketched out Monday by McCain and a bipartisan group of senators. Other supporters of the framework include top-ranking Democrats Sens. Dick DurbinRichard (Dick) Joseph DurbinDurbin calls Mueller report findings on Trump team 'troubling' Congress opens door to fraught immigration talks McConnell: 'Past time' for immigration-border security deal MORE (Ill.), Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerMJ Hegar announces Texas Senate bid Hillicon Valley: House Dems subpoena full Mueller report | DOJ pushes back at 'premature' subpoena | Dems reject offer to view report with fewer redactions | Trump camp runs Facebook ads about Mueller report | Uber gets B for self-driving cars Dem legal analyst says media 'overplayed' hand in Mueller coverage MORE (N.Y.) and Robert MenendezRobert (Bob) MenendezWe can accelerate a cure for Alzheimer's The Hill's 12:30 Report: Manafort sentenced to total of 7.5 years in prison Acting Defense chief calls Graham an 'ally' after tense exchange MORE (N.J.).

During the press conference, Rubio said the principles included in the comprehensive framework were "very similar, if not the same" to a broad immigration plan he sketched out in press interviews earlier this month.

"It's the reason why I signed onto this," Rubio said.

When outlining his immigration plan to The Wall Street Journal this month, Rubio voiced support for bringing more high-skilled labor into the U.S.

The Immigration Innovation Act set to be introduced on Tuesday proposes to increase the cap for H-1B visas to 115,000 from the current cap of 65,000. It would also include a mechanism that would adjust the H-1B cap according to market demand, so it would allow for additional visas to be made available to foreign workers if the cap is hit early during a particular year. However, it can only hit a ceiling of 300,000 visas.

The bill also attempts to reduce the backlog for green cards by exempting certain groups of people from the employment-based green card cap, such as dependents of employment-based visa recipients and foreign-born gradates from U.S. universities with advanced degrees in math, science and engineering.

In addition to Rubio, the co-sponsors of the bill include Sens. Orrin HatchOrrin Grant HatchHatch warns 'dangerous' idea of court packing could hurt religious liberty Former Democratic aide pleads guilty to doxing GOP senators attending Kavanaugh hearing How do we prevent viral live streaming of New Zealand-style violence? MORE (R-Utah), Amy KlobucharAmy Jean KlobucharHarris wins town hall war among CNN viewers Cory Booker releases 10 years of tax returns Dems accuse White House of caving to Trump's 'ego' on Russian meddling MORE (D-Minn.) and Chris CoonsChristopher (Chris) Andrew CoonsMenendez, Rubio lead Senate effort to regulate Venezuelan sanctions Dem report questions State Dept. decision to revoke award to Trump critic Booker takes early lead in 2020 endorsements MORE (D-Del.).

In a statement, former Sen. John Sununu (R-N.H.) said any comprehensive immigration bill should include the measures in the Immigration Innovation Act. Sununu and Democratic strategist Maria Cardona are co-charing inSPIRE STEM USA, a coalition made up of organizations and companies such as Microsoft, Intel and IBM that is pushing for high-skilled immigration reform and for Congress to strengthen science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) education programs in the U.S.

“Any broad-based immigration reform effort would be smart to tackle this pressing problem,” Sununu said in the statement. “We should not miss the opportunity to create a stronger STEM education pipeline in the U.S. and to close the STEM jobs gap that we have today.“