Senate Dems press internet service providers over privacy policies

Senate Dems press internet service providers over privacy policies
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A group of Senate Democrats is asking top telecom companies to provide details of their privacy policies in the wake of Republicans’ repeal of broadband privacy rules this week.

The senators, led by Sen. Ed MarkeyEdward (Ed) John MarkeyMoulton drops out of presidential race after struggling to gain traction Joseph Kennedy mulling primary challenge to Markey in Massachusetts Overnight Energy: Trump sparks new fight over endangered species protections | States sue over repeal of Obama power plant rules | Interior changes rules for ethics watchdogs MORE (D-Mass.), sent letters containing a list of questions about privacy to AT&T, Comcast, Charter, Verizon, Sprint, T-Mobile and CenturyLink.

President Trump on Monday signed a bill repealing Federal Communications Commission rules that would have prevented internet service providers from using certain categories of their customers’ data for advertising without their permission.

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In their list of questions, the senators grill the companies on what their policies are regarding the use of sensitive information for advertising.

“Do you obtain affirmative opt-in consent to use, share, or sell any of the following information: web browsing history, app usage history, the content of communications, children’s information, health information, financial information, geo-location, and Social Security numbers?” reads one. 

“If yes, please detail your policy. If no, why not? If no, please disclose what information you are sharing and selling and with whom you are sharing or selling that information.”

The letter was also signed by Sens. Al FrankenAlan (Al) Stuart FrankenFormer GOP Rep. Jason Lewis says he'll challenge Tina Smith in Minnesota Native American advocates question 2020 Democrats' commitment Reid says he wishes Franken would run for Senate again MORE (D-Minn.), Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.), Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenGabbard hits DNC over poll criteria for debates The Hill's Campaign Report: Democratic field begins to shrink ahead of critical stretch Keystone XL Pipeline gets nod from Nebraska Supreme Court MORE (D-Mass.), Bernie SandersBernie SandersGabbard hits DNC over poll criteria for debates The Hill's Campaign Report: Democratic field begins to shrink ahead of critical stretch Keystone XL Pipeline gets nod from Nebraska Supreme Court MORE (I-Vt.), Ron WydenRonald (Ron) Lee WydenWyden blasts FEC Republicans for blocking probe into NRA over possible Russia donations Wyden calls for end to political ad targeting on Facebook, Google Ex-CIA chief worries campaigns falling short on cybersecurity MORE (D-Ore.), Patrick LeahyPatrick Joseph LeahyAppropriators warn White House against clawing back foreign aid House panel investigating decision to resume federal executions Graham moves controversial asylum bill through panel; Democrats charge he's broken the rules MORE (D-Vt.) and Chris Van Hollen (D-Md.).

Republicans pushed the bill to repeal the rules through the House and Senate last month, prompting an outcry from consumer advocates and privacy groups. The bill’s proponents argue that the rules unfairly subjected internet service providers to restrictions not faced by websites like Facebook and Google, which also employ data-driven marketing.