Senate Dems offer bill to restore internet privacy rules

Senate Dems offer bill to restore internet privacy rules
© Getty

Senate Democrats introduced legislation on Thursday that would reinstate internet privacy rules repealed earlier this week.

The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) rule, passed in October, required internet service providers to get permission from customers before selling data about them to advertisers.

A bill to repeal the rules narrowly passed Congress last month, and President Trump signed it into law on Monday. That measure also prohibits the FCC from reinstating the regulations or anything substantially similar.

ADVERTISEMENT

The new legislation, introduced by Sen. Ed MarkeyEd MarkeyBiden comments add momentum to spending bill's climate measures  Overnight Energy & Environment — Starting from 'scratch' on climate, spending bill Overnight Health Care — White House boosts mask availability MORE (D-Mass.), would undo the repeal and reinstate the regulations, which were set to go into effect later this year.

“Thanks to Congressional Republicans, corporations, not consumers, are in control of sensitive information about Americans’ health, finances, and children,” Markey said in a statement. 

“The Republican roll-back of strong broadband privacy rules means ISP no longer stands for Internet Service Provider, it stands for ‘Information Sold for Profit.’” 

The bill is being co-sponsored by Sens. Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.), Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenArizona Democratic Party executive board censures Sinema Democrats call on Biden administration to ease entry to US for at-risk Afghans Biden stiff arms progressives on the Postal Service MORE (D-Mass.), Bernie SandersBernie SandersPoll: Trump leads 2024 Republican field with DeSantis in distant second The Hill's 12:30 Report - Presented by Facebook - Biden faces Ukraine decision amid Russia aggression The Hill's Morning Report - US warns Kremlin, weighs more troops to Europe MORE (I-Vt.), Jeff MerkleyJeff MerkleyDemocrats call on Biden administration to ease entry to US for at-risk Afghans Manchin, Sinema join GOP to sink filibuster change for voting bill Senate GOP blocks election bill, setting up filibuster face-off MORE (D-Ore.), Martin HeinrichMartin Trevor HeinrichDemocrats torn over pushing stolen-election narrative Overnight Energy & Environment — Starting from 'scratch' on climate, spending bill Eight senators ask Biden to reverse course on Trump-era solar tariffs MORE (D-N.M.), Tom UdallTom UdallCruz to get Nord Stream 2 vote as part of deal on Biden nominees Democrats threaten to play hardball over Cruz's blockade Rubio vows to slow-walk Biden's China, Spain ambassador nominees MORE (D-N.M.), Patrick LeahyPatrick Joseph LeahyThese Senate seats are up for election in 2022 Senate panel advances bill blocking tech giants from favoring own products Former US attorney considering Senate run in Vermont as Republican MORE (D-Vt.), Tammy BaldwinTammy Suzanne BaldwinBiden stiff arms progressives on the Postal Service Overnight Energy & Environment — Lummis holds up Biden EPA picks Dems block Cruz's Nord Stream 2 sanctions bill MORE (D-Wis.), Chris Van Hollen (D-Md.) and Al FrankenAlan (Al) Stuart FrankenMeet the Democrats' last best hope of preserving a House majority Franken rules out challenge against Gillibrand for Senate seat Franken targets senators from both parties in new comedy tour MORE (D-Minn.).

It is extremely unlikely Markey's bill will get off the ground, and Republicans have stood by the move in the face of criticism.

Defenders of the repeal say that the regulations unfairly subjected internet service providers to privacy restrictions not required of websites like Facebook and Google, which account for much of the internet’s advertising market.