SPONSORED:

Billboard ads target Republicans who want to roll back net neutrality

Billboard ads target Republicans who want to roll back net neutrality
© Courtesy of Fight For The Future

An advocacy group is launching an ad campaign targeting lawmakers who want to roll back the Federal Communications Commission’s (FCC) net neutrality rules.

Fight For The Future, a pro-net neutrality advocacy group, bought billboards in six states to target Sens. John ThuneJohn Randolph ThuneGOP split on counteroffer to Biden's spending Senate GOP dismayed by vote to boot Cheney Top Democrat: FCC actions are a 'potential setback' to autonomous vehicles MORE (R-S.D.) and Roger WickerRoger Frederick WickerBiden says he and GOP both 'sincere about' seeking infrastructure compromise The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Biden expresses optimism on bipartisanship; Cheney ousted Hillicon Valley: Global cybersecurity leaders say they feel unprepared for attack | Senate Commerce Committee advances Biden's FTC nominee Lina Khan | Senate panel approves bill that would invest billions in tech MORE (R-Miss.), as well as Speaker Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanBiden's relationship with top House Republican is frosty The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Emergent BioSolutions - Facebook upholds Trump ban; GOP leaders back Stefanik to replace Cheney Budowsky: Liz Cheney vs. conservatives in name only MORE (R-Wis.), House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.) and Reps. Marsha BlackburnMarsha BlackburnHillicon Valley: Global cybersecurity leaders say they feel unprepared for attack | Senate Commerce Committee advances Biden's FTC nominee Lina Khan | Senate panel approves bill that would invest billions in tech Senate Commerce Committee advances Biden's FTC nominee Lina Khan The Memo: Trump's critics face wrath of GOP base MORE (R-Tenn.) and Tom GravesJohn (Tom) Thomas GravesGreene's future on House committees in limbo after GOP meeting McConnell says Taylor Greene's embrace of conspiracy theories a 'cancer' GOP has growing Marjorie Taylor Greene problem MORE (R-Ga.).

The billboards show the lawmakers’ faces with text criticizing their stance and urging the public to call their offices.

ADVERTISEMENT

The billboard targeting Ryan reads: “Want slower, more expensive Internet? Rep. Paul Ryan supports Charter’s plan to destroy net neutrality.”

The billboards in Tennessee hitting Blackburn read: “Rep. Blackburn took money from Verizon. Now she wants to give ISPs [internet service providers] powers to censor, slow and tax your internet.”

In April, Republican FCC Chairman Ajit Pai introduced his “Restoring Internet Freedom” proposal, which would scrap the Obama-era net neutrality rules. The rules are aimed at creating a level playing field on the internet and bar broadband providers from slowing or blocking certain traffic.

Republicans such as Thune, Blackburn and others quickly backed the plan, arguing that net neutrality regulations were stifling broadband companies’ ability to innovate and provide better internet access to consumers.

But advocacy groups like Fight For The Future and industry trade groups, including the Internet Association, which represents companies such as Facebook, Google and Amazon, argue that without net neutrality regulations, broadband providers could take advantage of consumers by charging more for internet access and slowing down certain types of content.

“Politicians need to learn that they can’t attack free speech on the internet and expect to get away with it,” said Evan Greer, campaign director of Fight for the Future. “Voters from across the political spectrum all agree that they don’t want companies like Comcast and Verizon dictating what they can see and do online.”