AT&T workers in contract dispute to protest at iPhone launch

AT&T workers in contract dispute to protest at iPhone launch
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AT&T workers are planning a demonstration outside Apple headquarters on Tuesday during the highly anticipated iPhone 8 launch to draw attention to their ongoing contract dispute.

Members of the Communications Workers of America (CWA) say that AT&T has been cutting pay, laying off workers and offshoring jobs at an alarming rate.

According to the announcement, hundreds of workers are expected to show up and demonstrators plan to chant and display signs that read “iMay get outsourced by AT&T.”

AT&T spokesman Marty Richter said the new contract would offer employees competitive salaries, and that the company is confident the workers will “be better off financially in their new contract.”

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“As in all of our contract negotiations, we’re committed to working together with the union to reach a fair agreement that will allow us to continue to provide solid union careers with excellent wages and benefits,” Richter said.

An Apple spokesman did not immediately respond when asked to comment.

CWA wants AT&T to ensure that workers see pay increases to cover the rising cost of health care and to protect against offshoring.

Some workers met with members of Congress last week to highlight the contract dispute, which is affecting 21,000 employees.

Sen. Bernie SandersBernard (Bernie) SandersTrump's trade war — firing all cannons or closing the portholes? The Hill's 12:30 Report — Trump rips 'ridiculous' spending bill | FBI dragged into new fight | Latest on Maryland shooting Poll: Most Massachusetts voters don't think Warren should run for president in 2020 MORE (I-Vt.) posted a video of his meeting with the employees and applauded their efforts.

“While AT&T is making record profits of over $1 billion a month, they refuse to negotiate a fair new contract with their workers, cutting 12,000 jobs in the U.S. and shipping many of them overseas,” Sanders wrote in a Facebook post. “This is even while paying a corporate tax rate of only 8% between 2005-2015. That’s not acceptable.”