Pelosi pushes for House vote on preserving net neutrality

Pelosi pushes for House vote on preserving net neutrality
© Greg Nash

House Minority Leader Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiDemocrats gear up for high-stakes Judiciary hearing White House, Democrats strike tentative deal to create Space Force in exchange for federal parental leave benefits: report Trump: Fox News 'panders' to Democrats by having on liberal guests MORE (D-Calif.) is pushing for a floor vote on a bill that would stop the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) from repealing net neutrality.

“December’s radical FCC vote to dismantle net neutrality has endangered the American entrepreneurship and freedom that are the envy of the world,” Pelosi said in a statement Thursday.

“Congress must act to reverse this destructive FCC ruling that steamrolled over a bipartisan, decades-long consensus and the will of the American people to undermine the fair playing field that is the heart of the internet.”

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Rep. Mike DoyleMichael (Mike) F. DoyleDemocrats demand FCC act over leak of phone location data Hillicon Valley: Google, Reddit to testify on tech industry protections | Trump joins Amazon-owned Twitch | House to vote on bill to combat foreign interference Reddit, Google to testify before House panel on tech's legal protections MORE (D-Pa.), the ranking member on the subcommittee that oversees the FCC, announced this week that his bill to block the repeal has lined up 82 co-sponsors, including Pelosi. A companion bill in the Senate being pushed by Sen. Ed MarkeyEdward (Ed) John MarkeyThere's a lot to like about the Senate privacy bill, if it's not watered down Trump administration drops plan to face scan all travelers leaving or entering US Advocates hopeful dueling privacy bills can bridge partisan divide MORE (D-Mass.) needs just one more Republican backer to pass and already has enough support for Democrats to force a floor vote.

House Democrats can't force a vote on their bill, but Pelosi’s endorsement is further evidence that Democrats see net neutrality as a winning political issue.

The FCC voted 3-2 along party lines last month to scrap the Obama-era rules that required internet service providers to treat all web traffic equally. Republicans argue that the rules were heavy-handed and unnecessary for preserving an open internet.

Democrats, and most Americans, see the rules as a vital check on the power of companies like AT&T and Verizon.

“Congress must respond to the will of the American people and restore these fundamental consumer protections,” Pelosi said.