Dem senator presses FTC to ramp up Equifax hack probe

Dem senator presses FTC to ramp up Equifax hack probe
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Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy Jean KlobucharSenate Democrats increase pressure for FBI investigation of Kavanaugh Election Countdown: Trump confident about midterms in Hill.TV interview | Kavanaugh controversy tests candidates | Sanders, Warren ponder if both can run | Super PACs spending big | Two states open general election voting Friday | Latest Senate polls GOP in striking distance to retake Franken seat MORE (D-Minn.) is urging the Federal Trade Commission to pour more resources into its probe of the Equifax data breach after reports that another agency, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB), is freezing its own investigation.

Reuters reported on Sunday that Mick MulvaneyJohn (Mick) Michael MulvaneyProtect the Military Lending Act On The Money: Midterms to shake up House finance panel | Chamber chief says US not in trade war | Mulvaney moving CFPB unit out of DC | Conservatives frustrated over big spending bills Warren suggests Mulvaney broke law by speaking to GOP donors MORE, the CFPB’s acting director, has been dialing back the agency’s questioning of Equifax officials and has not sought any subpoenas or sworn testimony.

“In light of this concerning development, I urge the FTC to consider increasing the resources and manpower dedicated to its own investigation of the Equifax breach announced in September 2017,” Klobuchar wrote to the two sitting FTC commissioners.

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“The FTC is well-positioned to investigate this matter and its effect on consumers and Director Mulvaney’s actions suggest that FTC may be the only independent federal agency left undertaking a thorough civil investigation.”

The FTC did not immediately respond when asked for comment.

The Equifax breach exposed sensitive personal information on more than 145 million people, including Social Security numbers and addresses. The FTC, Justice Department and CFPB all launched investigations into the breach, and the credit bureau’s former CEO testified in front of several congressional committees.

“A full and fair FTC investigation now appears to be the only way that we will determine the steps needed to prevent similar attacks in the future,” Klobuchar wrote.