Facebook exec apologizes for claim that Russian goal wasn’t to sway election: report

Facebook exec apologizes for claim that Russian goal wasn’t to sway election: report
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Facebook’s vice president of ads apologized for his claim that the goal of Russian ads on the social media platform was not to sway the 2016 presidential election.

“I wanted to apologize for having tweeted my own view about Russian interference without having it reviewed by anyone internally. The tweets were my own personal view and not Facebook’s. I conveyed my view poorly," Rob Goldman said on Monday, according to Wired.

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"The Special Counsel has far more information about what happened [than] I do—so seeming to contradict his statements was a serious mistake on my part," he continued. 

"To those of you who have reached out this weekend to offer your support, thank you. It means more than you know. And to all of you who have worked so hard over the last six months to demonstrate that we understand our responsibility to prevent abuse on Facebook—and are working hard to do better in the future—my deepest apologies." 

Goldman tweeted in response to special counsel Robert MuellerRobert Swan MuellerSasse: US should applaud choice of Mueller to lead Russia probe MORE's announced indictments on Friday, saying that most of Russian ad spending happened after the election and criticized the news media's coverage of the election meddling.

Joel Kaplan, Facebook's vice president of global policy, clarified that the company does not have any information that "contradicts" Mueller's indictments.

“Nothing we found contradicts the Special Counsel’s indictments," Joel Kaplan, Facebook's vice president of global policy said in a statement this weekend. "Any suggestion otherwise is wrong.”

President TrumpDonald John TrumpJoint Chiefs chairman denies report that US is planning to keep 1K troops in Syria Kansas Department of Transportation calls Trump 'delusional communist' on Twitter Trump has privately voiced skepticism about driverless cars: report MORE on Saturday retweeted Goldman, and ripped the news media. 

Mueller announced the indictments of 13 Russians for their role in election meddling last week.

The efforts, which allegedly began in 2014, were tied to Russia's Internet Research Agency, which is an operation based in St. Petersburg that is accused of using Facebook and other social media platforms to spread divisive messages leading up to the 2016 election.

Harper Neidig contributed

Updated at 9:57 a.m.