Ivanka Trump to host White House roundtable on sex trafficking bills

Ivanka Trump to host White House roundtable on sex trafficking bills
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Ivanka TrumpIvana (Ivanka) Marie TrumpOn The Money: Shutdown hits Day 24 | Trump touts need for wall in speech to farmers | Poll numbers sag | House Dems push stopgap bills | How the shutdown could harm the economy | TSA absences raise stakes for deal Ivanka Trump to help pick new World Bank president, but will not be one of the candidates Trump cancels Davos trip over shutdown MORE will host a roundtable at the White House on Tuesday afternoon to discuss controversial sex trafficking legislation that has created a rift in the tech industry, a White House spokesman confirmed to The Hill.

Those attending the meeting include Sens. Rob PortmanRobert (Rob) Jones PortmanSenators restart shutdown talks — and quickly hit roadblocks Dreamers-for-wall trade going nowhere in House On The Money: Trump says he won't declare emergency 'so fast' | Shutdown poised to become longest in history | Congress approves back pay for workers | More federal unions sue over shutdown MORE (R-Ohio), Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.) and Amy KlobucharAmy Jean KlobucharGillibrand to kickstart 2020 White House bid before weekend Iowa trip Hillicon Valley: House chair seeks emergency briefing on wireless industry's data sharing | AG nominee to recuse himself from AT&T-Time Warner merger | Dem questions Treasury, IRS on shutdown cyber risks Attorney General nominee to recuse himself from AT&T-Time Warner merger talks MORE (D-Minn.), as well as Reps. Ann WagnerAnn Louise WagnerGOP scrambles to prevent shutdown after right-wing insurrection Congress must restrain power of new consumer financial director GOP congresswoman says she opted out of NRCC run because McCarthy had 'a different plan' MORE (R-Mo.) and Mimi Walters (R-Calif.).

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Portman, Blumenthal, Wagner and Walters are pushing bills that would make it easier to take legal action against websites for enabling sex trafficking. The bills would amend a law known as Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act (CDA), which essentially gives internet platforms immunity from liability for content posted by third parties.

Some internet companies are worried that cutting into Section 230 will damage the legal framework that allows for free speech online and hurt smaller internet companies by forcing them to pour resources into scouring their sites for illicit content.

Also attending the meeting is Michael Beckerman, the head of the tech trade group the Internet Association; Chris Padilla, IBM’s head of regulatory affairs; and White House legislative affairs chief Marc Short.

The president’s daughter has endorsed the Wagner bill, called the Allow States and Victims to Fight Online Sex Trafficking Act (FOSTA), which passed the House last month. Earlier on Tuesday, a group of companies including IBM and Oracle sent a letter to Senate leaders urging them to pass the bill.

It appears that the legislation will pass easily, despite opposition from many corners of the tech industry.