Facebook to meet with officials on Capitol Hill amidst Cambridge Analytica fallout

Facebook to meet with officials on Capitol Hill amidst Cambridge Analytica fallout
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Facebook officials are scheduled to meet with officials on Capitol Hill this week to discuss the controversy around Cambridge Analytica's alleged misuse of its platform.
 
The officials will brief Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee staff on Wednesday, according to two sources with knowledge of the meeting. 
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Facebook told The Hill that it will meet with staff from the House and Senate Intelligence committees, the House Energy and Commerce Committee and the Senate Commerce Committee, as well as the  House and Senate Judiciary committees, on Capitol Hill this week to discuss its dealings with Cambridge Analytica. 
 
The firm, a political and corporate information consultant used by the Trump campaign in 2016 for voter research, was suspended from the social media site after it was revealed that it took data from 50 million Facebook accounts without the platform's permission.
  
Cambridge Analytica has contested this version of events. The firm did work for President TrumpDonald John TrumpSecret Service members who helped organize Pence Arizona trip test positive for COVID-19: report Trump administration planning pandemic office at the State Department: report Iran releases photo of damaged nuclear fuel production site: report MORE's 2016 campaign and is also alleged to have links to the Brexit campaign in the United Kingdom, which advocated for leaving the European Union.
 
Facebook came under fire from lawmakers after the reports. 

Sens. Amy KlobucharAmy KlobucharThe Hill's Coronavirus Report: Rep. Rodney Davis says most important thing White House can do on COVID-19 is give consistent messaging; US new cases surpass 50k for first time The Hill's Coronavirus Report: Stagwell President Mark Penn says Trump is losing on fighting the virus; Fauci says U.S. 'going in the wrong direction' in fight against virus Hillicon Valley: Facebook takes down 'boogaloo' network after pressure | Election security measure pulled from Senate bill | FCC officially designating Huawei, ZTE as threats MORE (D-Minn.), John KennedyJohn Neely KennedyMORE (R-La.), Mark WarnerMark Robert WarnerSenators press IRS chief on stimulus check pitfalls Hillicon Valley: Facebook takes down 'boogaloo' network after pressure | Election security measure pulled from Senate bill | FCC officially designating Huawei, ZTE as threats Overnight Defense: Democrats blast Trump handling of Russian bounty intel | Pentagon leaders set for House hearing July 9 | Trump moves forward with plan for Germany drawdown MORE (D-Va.) and Jerry MoranGerald (Jerry) MoranWatchdog accuses Commerce of holding up 'Sharpiegate' probe report Senate Democrats push federal agencies to combat coronavirus scams and robocalls Coronavirus Report: The Hill's Steve Clemons interviews Mayor Quinton Lucas MORE (R-Kan.) have all said that they want to see Facebook chief executive Mark ZuckerbergMark Elliot ZuckerbergHillicon Valley: Senate panel advances bill targeting online child sexual abuse | Trump administration awards tech group contract to build 'virtual' wall | Advocacy groups urge Congress to ban facial recognition technologies Facebook to launch Fourth of July voter registration drive Hillicon Valley: Facebook claims it 'does not profit from hate' in open letter | Analysis finds most of Facebook's top advertisers have not joined boycott | Research finds Uighurs targeted by Chinese spyware as part of surveillance campaign MORE testify on Capitol Hill in front of lawmakers.

They and other critical lawmakers say that Cambridge Analytica’s use of Facebook is another example of how the company is not doing enough to keep its platform safe and transparent and is evidence that further regulations on the company should be enacted.

Klobuchar and Warner have specifically pushed their Honest Ads Act legislation in response to the revelations about Cambridge Analytica’s alleged use of Facebook. Their bill would hold internet platforms like Facebook, Twitter and Google to the same political ad transparency standards as TV, radio and print mediums.

Facebook reportedly handed over information on the breach to Congress and the special counsel investigating Russian interference in the election, after it was discovered that the firm had met with Russian executives in the lead-up to the election. 

— Updated 1:40 p.m.
 
Olivia Beavers contributed.