Zuckerberg: Maybe tech should face some regulations

Zuckerberg: Maybe tech should face some regulations
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Facebook chief executive Mark ZuckerbergMark Elliot ZuckerbergFacebook tells Trump administration it will not create messaging 'backdoor' for law enforcement LGBTQ groups accuse Facebook ads of spreading misinformation about HIV drugs Trump, Pelosi on shortlist for Time Person of the Year MORE said on Wednesday that he’s open to having his company be regulated.

“Actually, I’m not sure we shouldn’t be regulated,” Zuckerberg said in an interview with CNN that represented some of his first public remarks since the Cambridge Analytica controversy plunged his company into crisis and led to calls for his testimony before Congress.

“I actually think the question is more ‘What is the right regulation?’ rather than ‘Yes or no, should it be regulated?’” Zuckerberg told CNN. 

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The Facebook CEO said that “he would love to see” new transparency regulations for political advertisements. Facebook has been criticized for a lack of transparency.

“If you look at how much regulation there is around advertising on TV, in print, you know, it's just not clear why there should be less on the internet,” he said.

Facebook and other tech firms have resisted legislative efforts in Congress to impose new regulations.

Late year, Sens. Amy KlobucharAmy Jean KlobucharTrump trade deal likely to sow division in Democratic presidential field Biden narrowly ahead in Iowa as Sanders surges, Warren drops: poll Overnight Defense: Dems unveil impeachment articles against Trump | Saudi military flight students grounded after shooting | Defense bill takes heat from progressives | Pentagon watchdog to probe use of personnel on border MORE (D-Minn.) and Mark WarnerMark Robert WarnerTikTok chief cancels Capitol Hill meetings, inflaming tensions Watchdog report finds FBI not motivated by political bias in Trump probe Ex-Rep. Scott Taylor to seek old Virginia seat MORE (D-Va.) introduced the Honest Ads Act, legislation that would hold internet platforms like Facebook to the same political ad disclosure standards as TV, radio and print political advertisements.

The bill has yet to gain traction in Congress. Even though Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainEx-Rep. Scott Taylor to seek old Virginia seat Man acquitted over tweet offering 0 to killing an ICE agent Lessons of the Kamala Harris campaign MORE (R-Ariz.) has backed the bill, few Republicans have been willing to follow suit and publicly jump on board.

Facebook has faced intense scrutiny from critics, including lawmakers on Capitol Hill, since it revealed that the British research firm Cambridge Analytica improperly took data from 50 million Facebook users without those users' consent.

The company had previously been scrutinized for how Russian groups used its platform to attempt to influence the 2016 presidential election.