Zuckerberg takes out full-page newspaper ads to pledge Facebook’s ‘responsibility’

Zuckerberg takes out full-page newspaper ads to pledge Facebook’s ‘responsibility’
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Facebook CEO Mark ZuckerbergMark Elliot ZuckerbergChina may be copying Facebook to build an intelligence weapon Facebook announces verification to images and video on platform Hillicon Valley: North Korean IT firm hit with sanctions | Zuckerberg says Facebook better prepared for midterms | Big win for privacy advocates in Europe | Bezos launches B fund to help children, homeless MORE took out full-page ads on Sunday in newspapers in both the U.S. and the U.K. to reiterate his promise to “do better” following reports that a data firm harvested data from millions of Facebook users without their permission. 

“You may have heard about a quiz app built by a university researcher that leaked Facebook data of millions of people in 2014. This was a breach of trust, and I’m sorry we didn’t do more at the time,” Zuckerberg wrote. “We’re now taking steps to make sure this doesn’t happen again.” 

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“Thank you for believing in this community. I promise to do better for you,” the message concludes. 

The ad, which included the Facebook logo in the lower left corner of the page, ran in U.S. newspapers including The New York Times, The Washington Post and The Wall Street Journal, as well as British newspapers like The Sunday Times, the Mail on Sunday and the Sunday Telegraph.

Facebook has faced intense scrutiny since it revealed earlier this month that the British research firm Cambridge Analytica improperly took data from 50 million Facebook users without those users' consent.

Cambridge Analytica was later hired by the Trump campaign.

After a few days of public silence, Zuckerberg did a series of appearances and interviews last week. He said the company made mistakes, and added that he’s open to having his company be regulated.

He still faces pressure from federal lawmakers who are calling on Zuckerberg to testify before Congress. The Facebook executive has said he'd be open to doing so, but added that he doesn't believe he's always the best company representative to speak on a given issue.