Ivanka Trump talks skills training legislation with senators, CEOs

Ivanka Trump talks skills training legislation with senators, CEOs
© Greg Nash

White House senior adviser and first daughter Ivanka TrumpIvana (Ivanka) Marie TrumpTrump, Harris, Ocasio-Cortez, Charlie Kirk among Twitter's most-engaged users Ivanka must recalibrate her paid family leave plan to make it tenable Four names emerge for UN position: report MORE discussed legislation to boost skills training for tech careers with senators and corporate executives on Wednesday night, according to a source familiar with the event.

Trump specifically talked with lawmakers and business leaders about reauthorizing the Perkins Act, a bill aimed at bolstering workforce education training, during a dinner she and husband Jared KushnerJared Corey KushnerFive things to know about Trump confidant Tom Barrack Dems open new front against Trump Dems launch investigation into Trump administration's dealings with Saudi Arabia MORE hosted at their home in northwest Washington, D.C.

The bill has been a priority for some major technology companies like IBM, whose CEO Ginni Rometty attended the dinner Wednesday night. The source noted though that the Perkins Act was a “priority topic” for Trump during the dinner.

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The individual described the dinner as “a positive and productive discussion on overcoming a handful of obstacles and getting this bill onto the Senate floor.”

Other attendees included Sens. Lamar AlexanderAndrew (Lamar) Lamar AlexanderSenate Dems to introduce resolution blocking Trump's emergency declaration GOP Sen. Collins says she'll back resolution to block Trump's emergency declaration The Hill's 12:30 Report: Trump escalates fight with NY Times MORE (R-Tenn.), Shelley Moore CapitoShelley Wellons Moore CapitoDems slam EPA plan for fighting drinking water contaminants GOP senator: Border deal is 'a very good compromise' Push to include contractor back pay in funding deal hits GOP roadblock MORE (R-W.Va.), Mike EnziMichael (Mike) Bradley EnziWill Senate GOP try to pass a budget this year? Presumptive benefits to Blue Water Navy veterans are a major win If single payer were really a bargain, supporters like Rep. John Yarmuth would be upfront about its cost MORE (R-Wyo.), Heidi HeitkampMary (Heidi) Kathryn HeitkampOvernight Energy: Trump taps ex-oil lobbyist Bernhardt to lead Interior | Bernhardt slams Obama officials for agency's ethics issues | Head of major green group steps down Trump picks ex-oil lobbyist David Bernhardt for Interior secretary On The Money: Shutdown Day 27 | Trump fires back at Pelosi by canceling her foreign travel | Dems blast 'petty' move | Trump also cancels delegation to Davos | House votes to disapprove of Trump lifting Russia sanction MORE (D-N.D.) and Amy KlobucharAmy Jean KlobucharHarry Reid says he won’t make 2020 endorsement until after Nevada caucus Gillibrand to appear on Fox News Monday night Overnight Energy: Trump ends talks with California on car emissions | Dems face tough vote on Green New Deal | Climate PAC backing Inslee in possible 2020 run MORE (D-Minn.), as well as Northrop Grumman CEO Wes Bush and Josh Bolton, the president of the Business Roundtable.

The Perkins Act was originally signed in 1984 and reauthorized in 1998, but proponents want changes that they say will make it more helpful to workers in a modern economy with a growing number of technical jobs.

An IBM spokesperson said the company believes an updated version of the act “can go a long way toward addressing America’s high-tech skills gap."

Some technology companies and researchers say action is needed to address a schism between available technical jobs and workers with the skills necessary to fill them.  

The bill has bipartisan support and passed in the House last year, but has yet to gain traction in this legislative session.