Bipartisan lawmaker duo: It's time to modernize government websites

Bipartisan lawmaker duo: It's time to modernize government websites
© Greg Nash

A pair of bipartisan lawmakers says it is time to give federal government websites a facelift.

Reps. Ro KhannaRohit (Ro) KhannaThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by the Air Line Pilots Association - Biden VP possible next week; Meadows says relief talks 'miles apart' Google's work from home extension could be a boon for rural America Sanders, Khanna introduce bill to produce face masks for all Americans MORE (D-Calif.) and John RatcliffeJohn Lee RatcliffeHillicon Valley: Google extending remote work policy through July 2021 | Intel community returns final Russia report to Senate committee after declassification | Study finds election officials vulnerable to cyberattacks Intel community returns final Russia report volume to Senate after declassification review Hillicon Valley: Feds warn hackers targeting critical infrastructure | Twitter exploring subscription service | Bill would give DHS cyber agency subpoena power MORE (R-Texas), in a Wired op-ed piece, argue that the federal government needs to redesign its public-facing websites and make them more functional.

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“It’s no secret that the federal government is way behind the private sector when it comes to modernization and technology,” the duo wrote. “Because of these outdated systems, many federal agencies rank staggeringly behind the private sector when it comes to customer service.”

Khanna and Ratcliffe cited studies saying that Healthcare.gov and USAJobs.gov were tied for the top spot as the worst government websites for customer service. The rankings came on the basis of several factors including the ability to get information, complete transactions and ease of appointment scheduling.

To the two lawmakers, government websites pale in comparison to their private sector equivalents as apps in areas like digital payment and digital booking get better and better.

“For years, the federal government has been playing catch-up with the private sector to adopt online services that become quickly outdated, leading to failures like the IRS’ website crash on Tax Day this year,” they wrote.

Besides being more helpful to consumers they said that they see another benefit: savings.

They cited IRS data showing that helping individuals on the phone costs more than $40 and more than $50 to help over mail. Helping customers via web-based interaction, though, costs just 22 cents though.

“The tools we need to restore the United States’ global leadership in technology and digital government are already at our fingertips,” they wrote. “Now it’s time to act.”