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WikiLeaks hit with DNC lawsuit — over Twitter

WikiLeaks hit with DNC lawsuit — over Twitter
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Lawyers representing the Democratic National Committee (DNC) on Friday served transparency advocates WikiLeaks with a lawsuit via Twitter, accusing the site of working with the Trump campaign and Russia to swing the 2016 election in President TrumpDonald John TrumpStephen Miller: Trump to further crackdown on illegal immigration if he wins US records 97,000 new COVID-19 cases, shattering daily record Biden leads Trump by 8 points nationally: poll MORE's favor.

The move came Friday after CBS News reported that multiple attempts by DNC lawyers to serve legal documents to WikiLeaks representatives by email were met with no response.

The DNC was one of multiple Democratic organizations hacked during the 2016 election, with the resulting emails and documents posted on WikiLeaks. The U.S. intelligence community believes Russia was behind the breach, with the intention of helping to elect Trump. 

WikiLeaks tweeted in April suggesting that the organization had received the DNC's lawsuit, calling it frivolous, and it has reportedly not responded to any direct attempts at communication from DNC attorneys.

"WikiLeaks seems to tweet daily," the DNC noted in a court filing, according to CBS.

The subpoena served Friday deals with a suit filed earlier this year in Manhattan. 

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Last month, special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) MuellerCNN's Toobin warns McCabe is in 'perilous condition' with emboldened Trump CNN anchor rips Trump over Stone while evoking Clinton-Lynch tarmac meeting The Hill's 12:30 Report: New Hampshire fallout MORE indicted 12 Russian intelligence officers in the DNC hack amid his ongoing probe into Moscow's 2016 election meddling.

Mueller’s probe has also focused on former Trump adviser Roger StoneRoger Jason StoneTrump grants clemency to five nonviolent offenders Trump remarks put pressure on Barr DOJ veteran says he's quitting over Barr's 'slavish obedience' to Trump MORE, who claimed to have been in contact with WikiLeaks and its founder, Julian Assange, through an intermediary during the election. Later reports indicated that Stone himself had directly messaged the organization.

Assange has denied allegations that he collaborated with Russia or Russian hackers during the election, maintaining WikiLeaks's public stance as a neutral repository that will receive information from any source.