Trump accuses social media companies of interfering to help Clinton

Trump accuses social media companies of interfering to help Clinton
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President TrumpDonald TrumpMeghan McCain: Democrats 'should give a little credit' to Trump for COVID-19 vaccine Trump testing czar warns lockdowns may be on table if people don't get vaccinated Overnight Health Care: CDC details Massachusetts outbreak that sparked mask update | White House says national vaccine mandate 'not under consideration at this time' MORE is accusing tech companies of aiding his 2016 opponent, Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonClintons, Stacey Abrams meeting Texas Democrats Biden says Russia spreading misinformation ahead of 2022 elections Highest-ranking GOP assemblyman in WI against another audit of 2020 vote MORE, during the election.

The president told right-leaning news site The Daily Caller in an interview published Wednesday that tech giants such as Twitter and Facebook were "super liberal companies in favor of Hillary Clinton" during the election.

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“Maybe I did a better job because I’m good with the Twitter and I’m good at social media, but the truth is they were all on Hillary Clinton’s side, and if you look at what was going on with Facebook and with Google and all of it, they were very much on her side,” Trump told the Caller.

Trump did not offer any evidence for his allegations.

Twitter and Facebook have publicly denied repeated accusations from Trump and other Republicans that the companies deliberately hid conservative views and posts from right-leaning accounts and politicians, a tactic referred to as "shadow-banning."

Trump's comments come as Tech CEOs gathered on Capitol Hill Wednesday for hearings in front of the Senate Intelligence Committee on election interference. Facebook chief operating officer Sheryl Sandberg and Twitter chief executive officer Jack Dorsey are testifying before the committtee. Google CEO Larry Page declined to attend.

Dorsey is also testifying before the House Energy and Commerce Committee later in the day over allegations of bias against conservatives on social media.

“We do not shadowban according to political ideology or viewpoint or content, period,” Dorsey told Fox News's Sean Hannity last month.

But those denials have failed to assuage Republicans, including the president.

Trump has offered various explanations for his defeat in the popular vote to Clinton during the 2016 election, including his unproven claim that millions of people voted illegally in her favor during the election.