Trump accuses social media companies of interfering to help Clinton

Trump accuses social media companies of interfering to help Clinton
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President TrumpDonald John TrumpActivists highlight Trump ties to foreign autocrats in hotel light display Jose Canseco pitches Trump for chief of staff: ‘Worried about you looking more like a Twinkie everyday’ Dershowitz: Mueller's report will contain 'sins' but no 'impeachable offense' MORE is accusing tech companies of aiding his 2016 opponent, Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonCohen once teased Hillary Clinton about going to prison. Now he's been sentenced to 36 months The Hill's 12:30 Report — Cohen gets three years in prison | Fallout from Oval Office clash | House GOP eyes vote on B for wall Contest offers 'Broadway play and chardonnay' with Clinton MORE, during the election.

The president told right-leaning news site The Daily Caller in an interview published Wednesday that tech giants such as Twitter and Facebook were "super liberal companies in favor of Hillary Clinton" during the election.

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“Maybe I did a better job because I’m good with the Twitter and I’m good at social media, but the truth is they were all on Hillary Clinton’s side, and if you look at what was going on with Facebook and with Google and all of it, they were very much on her side,” Trump told the Caller.

Trump did not offer any evidence for his allegations.

Twitter and Facebook have publicly denied repeated accusations from Trump and other Republicans that the companies deliberately hid conservative views and posts from right-leaning accounts and politicians, a tactic referred to as "shadow-banning."

Trump's comments come as Tech CEOs gathered on Capitol Hill Wednesday for hearings in front of the Senate Intelligence Committee on election interference. Facebook chief operating officer Sheryl Sandberg and Twitter chief executive officer Jack Dorsey are testifying before the committtee. Google CEO Larry Page declined to attend.

Dorsey is also testifying before the House Energy and Commerce Committee later in the day over allegations of bias against conservatives on social media.

“We do not shadowban according to political ideology or viewpoint or content, period,” Dorsey told Fox News's Sean Hannity last month.

But those denials have failed to assuage Republicans, including the president.

Trump has offered various explanations for his defeat in the popular vote to Clinton during the 2016 election, including his unproven claim that millions of people voted illegally in her favor during the election.