Google releases framework to guide data privacy legislation

Google releases framework to guide data privacy legislation
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Google on Monday released a set of privacy principles to guide Congress as it prepares to write legislation aimed at governing how websites collect and monetize user data.

The framework largely consists of privacy principles that Google already abides by or could easily bring itself into compliance with. It calls for allowing users to easily access and control the data that’s collected about them and requiring companies to be transparent about their data practices.

“This framework is based on established privacy frameworks, as well as our experience providing services that rely on personal data and our work to comply with evolving data protection laws around the world,” Keith Enright, Google’s chief privacy officer, wrote in a blog post. “These principles help us evaluate new legislative proposals and advocate for responsible, interoperable and adaptable data protection regulations.”

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The set of proposals is designed to be a baseline for federal rules regarding data collection. Google appears to be the first internet giant to release such a framework, but numerous trade associations have published their own in recent weeks.

The industry has gotten on board with the idea of a national privacy law in the weeks since California passed its own strict regulations aimed at cracking down on data collection and increasing user control. Internet companies have universally opposed the measure and have begun pushing Congress to establish a national law that would block states from implementing their own.

Enright and executives from other major tech and telecom companies will testify before the Senate Commerce Committee on Wednesday regarding their data practices.