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House Judiciary says Google CEO will testify later this year

House Judiciary says Google CEO will testify later this year
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The House Judiciary Committee said it will hold a hearing with Google CEO Sundar Pichai about “social media filtering practices” following a meeting between Republican congressmen and Pichai on Friday.

“Today we held a very productive meeting with Google CEO Sundar Pichai to discuss concerns regarding Google’s business practices,” Judiciary Chairman Bob GoodlatteRobert (Bob) William GoodlatteRosenstein to appear for House interview next week Fusion GPS co-founder pleads the Fifth following House GOP subpoena House Judiciary chairman threatens to subpoena Rosenstein MORE (R-Va.) said in a statement. “Following this meeting, I will officially be inviting Mr. Pichai to testify before the House Judiciary Committee at a hearing this fall.”

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Pichai, accompanied by Google’s Washington, D.C. staff swiftly left the Capitol Hill meeting without taking questions from reporters.

House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthyKevin Owen McCarthyMaxine Waters gets company in new GOP line of attack The Hill's Morning Report — Presented by the Coalition for Affordable Prescription Drugs — GOP faces ‘green wave’ in final stretch to the midterms Conservatives fear Trump will cut immigration deal MORE (R-Calif.) who organized the meeting, however, called the meeting “productive” and said that they spoke about topics including alleged bias against conservatives on tech platforms and Google’s reported plans to enter China’s search market.

McCarthy characterized some of the discussions on bias as “very frank,” and said that Pichai outlined challenges Google faces in addressing his and other Republicans concerns.

The House Majority Leader took a softer tone on Google’s reported work than many of his Republican colleagues.

“There’s a lot of companies in China now. I do not have a problem with an American company — I want to make sure that American companies are doing business in China. That’s good for America. I just don’t want to see censorship in the process either or government control,” McCarthy said.

Senators including Tom CottonThomas (Tom) Bryant CottonFlake: Congress should not continue Kavanaugh investigations GOP senator suspects Schumer of being behind release of Ford letter Susan Collins becomes top 2020 target for Dems MORE (R-Ark.), Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioO'Rourke's rise raises hopes for Texas Dems down ballot Meghan McCain calls Russian attacks against her father the 'highest compliment' to her family The Memo: Saudi storm darkens for Trump MORE (R-Fla.) and Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzGOP warns economy will tank if Dems win Ex-lawmaker urges Americans to publicly confront officials O'Rourke on calling Cruz 'Lyin' Ted': 'That wasn't the best phrase for me to use' MORE (R-Texas) have all hammered Google over its Project Dragonfly, which The Intercept reports is focused on creating a search engine that would comply with Chinese censorship and privacy laws.

Google has not confirmed or denied that this is the project's goal but has said it is not close to launching a search product in China.

McCarthy also spoke more broadly about allegations of anti-conservative bias in tech. He said that Republicans have demonstrated bias by tech companies and called it an inevitable part of “human nature,” but one that can be fixed with more “transparency and fairness.”

Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey already testified before the House Energy and Commerce Committee earlier in September, to discuss allegations of conservative bias on his platform. That hearing appeared to go smoothly for the Twitter chief, who denied any intentional bias on the platform and vowed to take steps to address GOP concerns.

Pichai, however, will face a Judiciary Committee that's seen as less favorable to tech companies and is expected to be more critical.

Updated at 1:42 p.m.