Tech workers' political donations overwhelmingly skew Democratic: report

Tech workers' political donations overwhelmingly skew Democratic: report

Partisan donations this political cycle from workers at technology giants skew overwhelmingly Democratic, according a report released Friday, though the majority of the workers' donations go to nonpartisan organizations.

A Wired analysis of about 125,000 donations from employees of Amazon, Apple, Facebook, Google and Microsoft found that 23 percent of all donations made during the first nine months of 2018 went to Democratic candidates or Democratic groups, while just 1 percent went to Republicans. The remainder was split between nonpartisan political groups, at 67 percent, and company PACs with 9 percent.

ADVERTISEMENT

ActBlue, a fundraising platform that crowdsources small-dollar donations for progressive Democratic candidates, was the highest recipient of tech workers' donations during 2018 — other than Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos's $10 million donation to the With Honor PAC, a nonpartisan group that works to elect veterans to public office.

The Democratic National Committee, as well as the party's House and Senate campaign arms, were also top recipients of donations, while New Jersey Sen. Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerDe Blasio pitches himself as tough New Yorker who can take on 'Don the con' Sanders pledges to only nominate Supreme Court justices that support Roe v. Wade From dive bars to steakhouses: How Iowa caucus staffers blow off steam MORE (D) was the most-donated-to politician on the list.

Other top Democrats on the list include Texas Rep. Beto O'RourkeBeto O'RourkeOvernight Energy: Warren wants Dems to hold climate-focused debate | Klobuchar joins candidates rejecting fossil fuel money | 2020 contender Bennet offers climate plan O'Rourke says he would 'absolutely' do Fox News town hall CNN announces four more town halls featuring 2020 Dems MORE, whose campaign for Senate against Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzCruz slams Jim Carrey's 'vicious, angry' painting of Alabama governor after abortion ban Eye-popping number of Dems: I can beat Trump 'SleepyCreepy Joe' and 'Crazy Bernie': Trump seeks to define 2020 Dems with insults MORE (R) has gained national attention in recent months.

The fundraising disparity among workers is in sharp contrast to the spending of top tech companies' political action committees, which Wired notes in the analysis was more evenly split between Democrats and Republicans.

The analysis largely follows a trend previously reported during the 2016 election, when more than 80 percent of direct candidate or group donations from tech workers were reported to have gone to Democratic-aligned causes.

Conservatives have battled tech companies including Twitter and Facebook for months over claims that workers at the companies deliberately censor conservative views through "shadow-banning," a practice the companies have denied using.