Senators demand answers from Facebook on paying teens for data

A bipartisan trio of senators is demanding answers from Facebook about its practice of paying teenagers and young adults for access to their mobile phone and browsing data.

Sens. Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.), Ed MarkeyEdward (Ed) John MarkeyUS must act as journalists continue to be jailed in record numbers Warren proposes 'Blue New Deal' to protect oceans There's a lot to like about the Senate privacy bill, if it's not watered down MORE (D-Mass.) and Josh HawleyJoshua (Josh) David HawleySenate Republicans air complaints to Trump administration on trade deal Hillicon Valley: Pentagon pushes back on Amazon lawsuit | Lawmakers dismiss Chinese threat to US tech companies | YouTube unveils new anti-harassment policy | Agencies get annual IT grades Lawmakers dismiss Chinese retaliatory threat to US tech MORE (R-Mo.) sent a letter to Facebook CEO Mark ZuckerbergMark Elliot ZuckerbergOverwhelming majority say social media companies have too much influence: poll The Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by AdvaMed - House panel expected to approve impeachment articles Thursday Facebook tells Trump administration it will not create messaging 'backdoor' for law enforcement MORE on Thursday expressing concern about privacy implications of the program, known as Project Atlas.

“These reports fit with longstanding concerns that Facebook has used its products to deeply intrude into personal privacy,” the senators wrote.

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The program was revealed last week by TechCrunch, which reported that Facebook had been using the data collected on users as young as 13 in order to determine market trends. The users were offered up to $20 per month for total access to their usage data.

Asked for comment about the letter on Thursday, a Facebook spokesperson provided an earlier statement about the program.

“This is a Facebook research app - it's very clear to the people participating that it's completely opt in, they go through a rigorous consent flow and people are compensated,” the statement says. “That said, we know we have work to do to make sure people's data is protected. It's your information and you put it on Facebook so you need to know what's happening. We continue to focus on this work.”

The senators also sent letters to Google and Apple inquiring about their app store policies. After Project Atlas and a similar Google app were revealed, Apple revoked both companies’ permission to operate internal employee apps on its iOS platform.

The lawmakers asked for responses to their lists of questions by March 1.