Senators demand answers from Facebook on paying teens for data

A bipartisan trio of senators is demanding answers from Facebook about its practice of paying teenagers and young adults for access to their mobile phone and browsing data.

Sens. Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.), Ed MarkeyEdward (Ed) John MarkeyDemocrats brush off GOP 'trolling' over Green New Deal The Green New Deal would benefit independent family farmers Juan Williams: America needs radical solutions MORE (D-Mass.) and Josh HawleyJoshua (Josh) David HawleySenators demand answers from Facebook on paying teens for data Senate Dems block Sasse measure meant to respond to Virginia bill On The Money: Shutdown Day 26 | Pelosi calls on Trump to delay State of the Union | Cites 'security concerns' | DHS chief says they can handle security | Waters lays out agenda | Senate rejects effort to block Trump on Russia sanctions MORE (R-Mo.) sent a letter to Facebook CEO Mark ZuckerbergMark Elliot ZuckerbergHillicon Valley: Kremlin seeks more control over Russian internet | Huawei CEO denies links to Chinese government | Facebook accused of exposing health data | Harris calls for paper ballots | Twitter updates ad rules ahead of EU election Patients, health data experts accuse Facebook of exposing personal info Hillicon Valley: New York says goodbye to Amazon's HQ2 | AOC reacts: 'Anything is possible' | FTC pushes for record Facebook fine | Cyber threats to utilities on the rise MORE on Thursday expressing concern about privacy implications of the program, known as Project Atlas.

“These reports fit with longstanding concerns that Facebook has used its products to deeply intrude into personal privacy,” the senators wrote.

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The program was revealed last week by TechCrunch, which reported that Facebook had been using the data collected on users as young as 13 in order to determine market trends. The users were offered up to $20 per month for total access to their usage data.

Asked for comment about the letter on Thursday, a Facebook spokesperson provided an earlier statement about the program.

“This is a Facebook research app - it's very clear to the people participating that it's completely opt in, they go through a rigorous consent flow and people are compensated,” the statement says. “That said, we know we have work to do to make sure people's data is protected. It's your information and you put it on Facebook so you need to know what's happening. We continue to focus on this work.”

The senators also sent letters to Google and Apple inquiring about their app store policies. After Project Atlas and a similar Google app were revealed, Apple revoked both companies’ permission to operate internal employee apps on its iOS platform.

The lawmakers asked for responses to their lists of questions by March 1.