SPONSORED:

Senators demand answers from Facebook on paying teens for data

A bipartisan trio of senators is demanding answers from Facebook about its practice of paying teenagers and young adults for access to their mobile phone and browsing data.

Sens. Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.), Ed MarkeyEd MarkeyHillicon Valley: High alert as new QAnon date approaches Thursday | Biden signals another reversal from Trump with national security guidance | Parler files a new case Senators question Bezos, Amazon about cameras placed in delivery vans OVERNIGHT ENERGY: House Democrats reintroduce road map to carbon neutrality by 2050 | Kerry presses oil companies to tackle climate change | Biden delays transfer of sacred lands for copper mine MORE (D-Mass.) and Josh HawleyJoshua (Josh) David HawleyDeSantis, Pence tied in 2024 Republican poll Chamber of Commerce clarifies stance on lawmakers who voted against election certification Crenshaw pours cold water on 2024 White House bid: 'Something will emerge' MORE (R-Mo.) sent a letter to Facebook CEO Mark ZuckerbergMark Elliot ZuckerbergNY Times columnist David Brooks says think-tank role 'hasn't affected' his journalism New York Times expands its live news staff Hillicon Valley: YouTube to restore Trump's account | House-passed election bill takes aim at foreign interference | Senators introduce legislation to create international tech partnerships MORE on Thursday expressing concern about privacy implications of the program, known as Project Atlas.

“These reports fit with longstanding concerns that Facebook has used its products to deeply intrude into personal privacy,” the senators wrote.

ADVERTISEMENT

The program was revealed last week by TechCrunch, which reported that Facebook had been using the data collected on users as young as 13 in order to determine market trends. The users were offered up to $20 per month for total access to their usage data.

Asked for comment about the letter on Thursday, a Facebook spokesperson provided an earlier statement about the program.

“This is a Facebook research app - it's very clear to the people participating that it's completely opt in, they go through a rigorous consent flow and people are compensated,” the statement says. “That said, we know we have work to do to make sure people's data is protected. It's your information and you put it on Facebook so you need to know what's happening. We continue to focus on this work.”

The senators also sent letters to Google and Apple inquiring about their app store policies. After Project Atlas and a similar Google app were revealed, Apple revoked both companies’ permission to operate internal employee apps on its iOS platform.

The lawmakers asked for responses to their lists of questions by March 1.