Kudlow says Trump administration opposes government intervention in 5G

National Economic Council Director Larry Kudlow on Thursday said the Trump administration opposes government intervention in the deployment of next-generation wireless networks known as 5G. 

Kudlow, speaking at a wireless trade group event, promoted the administration's position that the private sector should drive 5G deployment. 

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"I don't want the government to run this," Kudlow said at an event hosted by CTIA in Washington, D.C. 

President TrumpDonald John TrumpDemocratic senator rips Trump's 'let them fight' remarks: 'Enough is enough' Warren warns Facebook may help reelect Trump 'and profit off of it' Trump touts Turkey cease-fire: 'Sometimes you have to let them fight' MORE's 2020 campaign, led by campaign manager Brad Parscale, previously raised eyebrows by promoting a nationalized 5G deployment plan, which would put the government in charge of making 5G widely available in the U.S. 

Kudlow and members of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) quickly opposed that plan, saying wireless companies should take the lead. 

The tech and telecom industries have been excitedly cheerleading the introduction of 5G, touting its potentially massive economic benefits. Next-generation 5G wireless is expected to provide internet connections that are exponentially faster than current speeds, enabling a host of new technologies, but skeptics of the technology say it is nowhere near ready for rollout. 

Kudlow's remarks on Thursday largely served as an assurance that the Trump administration still believes industry should lead the deployment of U.S. 5G. 

"We should stay on the free-market track," Kudlow said. "We want as much entrepreneurship as possible. We want to make sure the door is open for American companies and related suppliers." 

Some proponents of a nationalized plan say it would help the U.S. roll out 5G before China. The National Security Council last year put together a plan that would allow the Trump administration to build a nationwide 5G network to compete with China, which some say is racing ahead of the U.S. in the deployment of the next-generation technology.

Chinese telecom giant Huawei is playing a pivotal role in developing 5G networks in other countries, including many U.S. allies, but Washington has banned Huawei products in the U.S., citing national security concerns. U.S. officials have warned that companies such as Huawei could be compromised by Chinese intelligence.

"There will be a national security piece, without question, but it seems to me the way we’re doing things is the right way and we’ll continue that," Kudlow said. "The private sector will figure things out far better than the government sector. You’re far ahead of us, you always are."

Lawmakers on both sides of the aisle have opposed the plan, saying it would give the government too much control. A trio of senators — Sens. John CornynJohn CornynTrump slams 'very dumb' O'Rourke for proposals on guns, tax exempt status for churches GOP cautions Graham against hauling Biden before Senate Succession at DHS up in the air as Trump set to nominate new head MORE (R-Texas), Richard BurrRichard Mauze BurrEx-CIA agent: Whistleblower's complaint 'should be considered on its merits' Senate Intel chair: Whistleblower hasn't agreed to testify before panel Juan Williams: Trump, the conspiracy theory president MORE (R-N.C.), and Mark WarnerMark Robert WarnerLawmakers set to host fundraisers focused on Nats' World Series trip The Hill's 12:30 Report: Washington mourns loss of Elijah Cummings Lawmakers from both sides of the aisle mourn Cummings MORE (D-Va.) — last week introduced legislation that would reject a nationalized 5G strategy.