Congress has questions for Google's 'Sensorvault'

Congress has questions for Google's 'Sensorvault'
© Greg Nash

Top members on the House Energy and Commerce Committee are calling for answers from Google CEO Sundar Pichai on the tech giant’s “Sensorvault,” which holds the precise location information of hundreds of millions of consumers.

In a bipartisan letter sent to Pichai on Tuesday signed by Chairman Frank Pallone Jr.Frank Joseph PalloneHillicon Valley: Twitter says Trump 'go back' tweet didn't violate rules | Unions back protests targeting Amazon 'Prime Day' | Mnuchin voices 'serious concerns' about Facebook crypto project | Congress mobilizes on cyber threats to electric grid Congress mobilizes on cyber threats to electric grid Overnight Health Care — Sponsored by Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids — White House withdraws controversial rule to eliminate drug rebates | Grassley says deal on drug prices moving 'very soon' | Appeals court declines to halt Trump abortion referral ban MORE (D-N.J.), the lawmakers expressed concerns over consumer privacy, citing a report by The New York Times that the database contains the information of almost every Android user.

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Such information has been used in the past by police for criminal cases.

Users of the devices can essentially have their “whole pattern of life" tracked, since the data is collected even when apps aren’t being used and calls aren’t taking place, the lawmakers noted in their letter.

“The potential ramifications for consumer privacy are far reaching and concerning when examining the purposes for the Sensorvault database and how precise location information could be shared with third parties,” they wrote. “We would like to know the purposes for which Google maintains the Sensorvault database and the extent to which Google shares precise location information from this database with third parties.”

The lawmakers asking why Google stores the information, whether there are additional databases, who has access to the information, how accurate the information is, whether users can limit the company’s access to their information, what its retention policy is and whether it sells or shares the information with third parties.

The lawmakers requested to be briefed by the company by May 10 and that Google respond to written questions by May 7.

The panel’s ranking member, Rep. Greg WaldenGregory (Greg) Paul WaldenOvernight Energy: EPA expands use of pesticide it considers 'highly toxic' to bees | House passes defense bill with measure targeting 'forever chemicals' | Five things to watch as Barry barrels through the Gulf House passes bill to crack down on toxic 'forever chemicals' Overnight Defense: Woman accusing general of sexual assault willing to testify | Joint Chiefs pick warns against early Afghan withdrawal | Tensions rise after Iran tries to block British tanker MORE (R-Ore.), also signed on to the letter, as did Reps. Jan SchakowskyJanice (Jan) Danoff SchakowskyDemocrats rush to support Pelosi amid fight with Ocasio-Cortez Pelosi says she's done talking about fight with 'Squad' Democrats voice confidence Pentagon bill will survive party squabbling MORE (D-Ill.) and Cathy McMorris RodgersCathy McMorris RodgersOvernight Energy: Fight over fuel standards intensifies | Democrats grill Trump officials over rule rollback | California official blasts EPA chief over broken talks | Former EPA official says Wheeler lied to Congress EPA head clashes with California over how car emissions negotiations broke down Lawmakers celebrate 100th anniversary of women getting the right to vote MORE (R-Wash.).