Dem senators ask NSA for public update on mass phone data collection program

Dem senators ask NSA for public update on mass phone data collection program
© Stefani Reynolds

A group of six Democratic senators on the Senate Intelligence Committee is asking the National Security Agency (NSA) to release a public update on its mass phone data collection program, following reports indicating the spy agency has shut it down. 

"We write to urge that you provide a public description, consistent with protection of sources and methods, of the current status of the call detail record (CDR) program," the senators wrote in a letter to Paul Nakasone, head of the NSA.

The group of senators includes the Intelligence Committee's vice chairman, Sen. Mark WarnerMark Robert WarnerOvernight Defense: Trump hits Iranian central bank with sanctions | Trump meeting with Ukrainian leader at UN | Trump touts relationship with North Korea's Kim as 'best thing' for US Hillicon Valley: Zuckerberg courts critics on Capitol Hill | Amazon makes climate pledge | Senate panel approves 0M for state election security Zuckerberg woos Washington critics during visit MORE (D-Va.), Sen. Ron WydenRonald (Ron) Lee WydenOvernight Energy: California, 23 other states sue Trump over vehicle emissions rule | Climate strike protests hit cities across globe | Interior watchdog expands scope of FOIA investigation | Dems accuse officials of burying climate reports Microsoft to provide free updates for voting systems running Windows 7 through 2020 Interior watchdog investigating political appointees' review of FOIA requests MORE (D-Ore.), a privacy hawk, and 2020 contenders Sens. Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisWarren overtakes Biden in Iowa for first time: poll Iowa GOP swipes at 2020 Democrats' meat positions as candidates attend annual Steak Fry Warren avoids attacks while building momentum MORE (D-Calif.) and Michael BennetMichael Farrand BennetThe Hill's Campaign Report: De Blasio drops out | Warren gains support from black voters | Sanders retools campaign team | Warning signs for Tillis in NC Williamson: Climate change result of an 'amoral' economic system Bennet: 'This generation has a lot to be really angry at us about' MORE (D-Colo.), among others.

The Wall Street Journal last month reported that the NSA was recommending the White House officially end the agency's mass collection of U.S. phone data.

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Sources told the Journal that the NSA has concluded that the program, which gathered metadata on domestic text messages and phone calls, was too burdensome to maintain. 

The last time the NSA weighed in publicly about the program was when it announced last year that it had purged hundreds of millions of records after discovering the data had been “contaminated” by records it was not supposed to receive. 

"Since then, there have been no public updates from NSA," the senators wrote. "A public status report will resolve the current confusion, demonstrate the NSA’s commitment to transparency, and inform Congress’s deliberations about the possible reauthorization of the program later this year." 

The NSA in an email to The Hill confirmed it had received the letter.

"NSA has received the letter, is in the process of reviewing it and will respond accordingly," an agency spokesperson said.

The White House will ultimately decide whether to push for legislation to renew the program's legal authority. 

Senators appear to be split on the issue, with Sen. Richard BurrRichard Mauze BurrLawmakers applaud Trump's ban on flavored e-cigarettes Trump to hold campaign rally in North Carolina day before special House election Hoekstra emerges as favorite for top intelligence post MORE (R-N.C.), head of the Senate Intelligence Committee, signaling that he wants to renew the program's authority, while Warner has expressed skepticism. 

Privacy hawks in Congress and civil liberties advocates had been gearing up for a battle on Capitol Hill over the reauthorization of the program, but reports have for months indicated that the NSA is shuttering the program amid technical difficulties. 

The call records program was first revealed by whistleblower Edward Snowden six years ago. Following Snowden's disclosures, Congress passed the USA Freedom Act in 2015, which created a pared-down version of the phone surveillance program. 

Experts have said the restrictions placed on the program in that act might have rendered it inoperable. 

 

--This report was updated on May 8 at 1:12 p.m.