Dem senators ask NSA for public update on mass phone data collection program

Dem senators ask NSA for public update on mass phone data collection program
© Stefani Reynolds

A group of six Democratic senators on the Senate Intelligence Committee is asking the National Security Agency (NSA) to release a public update on its mass phone data collection program, following reports indicating the spy agency has shut it down. 

"We write to urge that you provide a public description, consistent with protection of sources and methods, of the current status of the call detail record (CDR) program," the senators wrote in a letter to Paul Nakasone, head of the NSA.

The group of senators includes the Intelligence Committee's vice chairman, Sen. Mark WarnerMark Robert WarnerTop Democrats demand security assessment of Trump properties Senate passes bill making hacking voting systems a federal crime Senators unload on Facebook cryptocurrency at hearing MORE (D-Va.), Sen. Ron WydenRonald (Ron) Lee WydenDemocrat: Treasury 'acknowledged the unprecedented process' in Trump tax return rejection Hillicon Valley: Twitter says Trump 'go back' tweet didn't violate rules | Unions back protests targeting Amazon 'Prime Day' | Mnuchin voices 'serious concerns' about Facebook crypto project | Congress mobilizes on cyber threats to electric grid Top Democrat demands answers on election equipment vulnerabilities MORE (D-Ore.), a privacy hawk, and 2020 contenders Sens. Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisBiden leads, Warren and Sanders tied for second in new poll Analysis: Harris, Buttigieg and Trump lead among California donations The Hill's Morning Report: Trump walks back from 'send her back' chants MORE (D-Calif.) and Michael BennetMichael Farrand BennetThe Hill's Morning Report: Trump walks back from 'send her back' chants Biden, Harris set for second Democratic debate showdown Health care moves to center stage in Democratic primary fight MORE (D-Colo.), among others.

The Wall Street Journal last month reported that the NSA was recommending the White House officially end the agency's mass collection of U.S. phone data.

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Sources told the Journal that the NSA has concluded that the program, which gathered metadata on domestic text messages and phone calls, was too burdensome to maintain. 

The last time the NSA weighed in publicly about the program was when it announced last year that it had purged hundreds of millions of records after discovering the data had been “contaminated” by records it was not supposed to receive. 

"Since then, there have been no public updates from NSA," the senators wrote. "A public status report will resolve the current confusion, demonstrate the NSA’s commitment to transparency, and inform Congress’s deliberations about the possible reauthorization of the program later this year." 

The NSA in an email to The Hill confirmed it had received the letter.

"NSA has received the letter, is in the process of reviewing it and will respond accordingly," an agency spokesperson said.

The White House will ultimately decide whether to push for legislation to renew the program's legal authority. 

Senators appear to be split on the issue, with Sen. Richard BurrRichard Mauze BurrOvernight Health Care — Presented by PCMA — Sanders mounts staunch defense of 'Medicare for All' | Biden, Sanders fight over health care heats up | House votes to repeal ObamaCare 'Cadillac Tax' | Dems want details on fetal tissue research ban Top North Carolina newspapers editorial board to GOP: 'Are you OK with a racist president?' Hillicon Valley: Senate bill would force companies to disclose value of user data | Waters to hold hearing on Facebook cryptocurrency | GOP divided on election security bills | US tracking Russian, Iranian social media campaigns MORE (R-N.C.), head of the Senate Intelligence Committee, signaling that he wants to renew the program's authority, while Warner has expressed skepticism. 

Privacy hawks in Congress and civil liberties advocates had been gearing up for a battle on Capitol Hill over the reauthorization of the program, but reports have for months indicated that the NSA is shuttering the program amid technical difficulties. 

The call records program was first revealed by whistleblower Edward Snowden six years ago. Following Snowden's disclosures, Congress passed the USA Freedom Act in 2015, which created a pared-down version of the phone surveillance program. 

Experts have said the restrictions placed on the program in that act might have rendered it inoperable. 

 

--This report was updated on May 8 at 1:12 p.m.