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Sandberg says breaking up Facebook wouldn't fix its problems

Sandberg says breaking up Facebook wouldn't fix its problems
© Greg Nash

Sheryl Sandberg, Facebook’s No. 2 executive, pushed back Friday on the growing calls to break up the social media company, arguing that it would not address the issues that have prompted worldwide public scrutiny.

“You could break us up, you could break other tech companies up, but you actually don't address the underlying issues people are concerned about,” Sandberg said in an interview with CNBC. “They're concerned about election security, they're concerned about content, they're concerned about privacy and data portability.”

And after meeting with lawmakers on Capitol Hill last week, Facebook's chief operating officer suggested that the half-trillion-dollar company is a countervailing force to Chinese tech giants.

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“Obviously any concerns we have are ones we need to answer but let me share with you something else I've heard in my meetings in D.C., and I've heard this in private meetings from both sides of the aisle, that while people are concerned with the size and power of tech companies, there's also a concern in the United States about the size and power of Chinese tech companies and the realization that those companies are not going to be broken up,” Sandberg said.

Still, there’s a growing constituency of lawmakers and 2020 presidential candidates who want to at least explore splitting up Facebook. Former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenGeraldo Rivera on Trump sowing election result doubts: 'Enough is enough now' Senate approves two energy regulators, completing panel Murkowski: Trump should concede White House race MORE and Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala HarrisWho will replace Harris in Senate? 'Rising' discusses Wisconsin formally declares Biden won election following recount Moderate Democrats: Everyone's older siblings MORE (D-Calif.) have both said it’s an idea worth considering, while progressives like Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenBiden budget pick sparks battle with GOP Senate Warren, Brown voice support for controversial Biden budget office pick Biden's economic team gets mixed reviews from Senate Republicans MORE (D-Mass.) and Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersBiden budget pick sparks battle with GOP Senate Overnight Defense: Defense bill among Congress's year-end scramble | Iranian scientist's assassination adds hurdles to Biden's plan on nuclear deal | Navy scrapping USS Bonhomme Richard after fire Biden faces new Iran challenges after nuclear scientist killed MORE (I-Vt.) have explicitly backed breaking the company up.

Sandberg’s response is that Facebook is changing its ways, citing on Friday the investments the company has made in things like data privacy and election security.

“We know at Facebook that we have a real responsibility to do better and earn back people's trust,” she said.