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Marianne Williamson most searched-for candidate during Democratic debate

Marianne Williamson most searched-for candidate during Democratic debate

Marianne WilliamsonMarianne WilliamsonMarianne Williamson discusses speaking at People's Party Convention Fewer people watched opening night of Democratic convention compared to 2016 Marianne Williamson: Democratic convention 'like binge watching a Marriott commercial' MORE was the most searched candidate during Tuesday night's Democratic debates, according to Google Trends.

Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersPush to expand Supreme Court faces Democratic buzzsaw Senate Democrats seek to alleviate public concern about some results not being available on election night Georgia senator mocks Harris's name before Trump rally: 'Kamala-mala-mala, I don't know' MORE (I-Vt.) came in second, followed by Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenPush to expand Supreme Court faces Democratic buzzsaw Georgia senator mocks Harris's name before Trump rally: 'Kamala-mala-mala, I don't know' Warren, Porter to headline progressive fundraiser supporting seven swing state candidates MORE (D-Mass.) and South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete ButtigiegPete ButtigiegButtigieg says it's time to 'turn the page' on Trump administration Sunday shows preview: Coronavirus cases surge in the Midwest; Trump hits campaign trail after COVID-19 Biden town hall questioner worked as speechwriter in Obama administration: report MORE.

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Williamson, a celebrity spiritual adviser and long-shot presidential candidate, also saw one of the most significant search spikes during last month's debates. Throughout Tuesday night, her speeches about topics including reparations, poverty and "dark psychic forces" drew rounds of applause from the audience.

Google searches for the phrase "dark psychic force" also trended during the debates after Williamson used the term to illustrate her concerns about the Trump administration.

"If you think any of this wonkiness is going to deal with this dark psychic force of the collectivized hatred that this president is bringing up in this country, then I’m afraid that the Democrats are going to see some very dark days," Williamson warned to applause from the audience.

Shortly after her remarks, there was a sharp spike in users Googling "dark psychic force," peaking in popularity around 9:40 PM, according to Google Trends. 

Former Rep. John DelaneyJohn DelaneyCoronavirus Report: The Hill's Steve Clemons interviews Rep. Rodney Davis Eurasia Group founder Ian Bremmer says Trump right on China but wrong on WHO; CDC issues new guidance for large gatherings The Hill's Coronavirus Report: Kansas City Mayor Quinton Lucas says country needs to rethink what 'policing' means; US cases surpass 2 million with no end to pandemic in sight MORE (D-Md.) and Rep. Tim RyanTimothy (Tim) RyanNow's the time to make 'Social Emotional Learning' a national priority Mourners gather outside Supreme Court after passing of Ruth Bader Ginsburg Lincoln Project hits Trump for criticizing Goodyear, 'an American company' MORE (D-Ohio) saw significant increases in Google searches for their names during the first hour of the debates, with Delaney's name seeing a 3,400 percent spike and Ryan seeing a 3,200 percent increase. Former Colorado Gov. John HickenlooperJohn HickenlooperPush to expand Supreme Court faces Democratic buzzsaw Democratic super PAC pulls remaining ads from Colorado Senate race Democrats see cash floodgates open ahead of Election Day MORE, Montana Gov. Steve BullockSteve BullockThe Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by Facebook - Trump combative, Biden earnest during distanced TV duel Steve Bullock raises .8 million in third quarter for Montana Senate bid Postal service reversing changes that slowed mail delivery MORE and Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy KlobucharSenate Democrats seek to alleviate public concern about some results not being available on election night Washington flooded with Women's March protesters ahead of Barrett confirmation vote Supreme Court battle turns into 2020 proxy war MORE (D-Minn.) came next, indicating the trend is connected to fewer voters knowing who those candidates are.

At the outset of the evening, searches for "debate" overtook "Bachelorette," the mega-popular television show that aired at the same time on Tuesday night, according to Google trends.