Authorities reviewed whether first responder posted about Epstein death on 4chan before official announcement

The New York City Fire Department (FDNY) said it reviewed a 4chan post purporting to be from a first responder detailing the death of accused sex trafficker Jeffrey Epstein more than 30 minutes before it was made public, BuzzFeed News reported.

"The FDNY reviewed the alleged information and determined it did not come from the Department," FDNY spokesman Frank Dwyer told The Hill on Tuesday.

Dwyer emphasized that "at no time was there an investigation" into the information and called BuzzFeed's initial story "inaccurate."

The outlet issued a correction Tuesday noting that the department conducted a "review" instead of a more formal "investigation" into the information.

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BuzzFeed reported that a user on 4chan, a message board popular among white supremacists and conspiracy theorists, reportedly wrote: “dont ask me how I know, but Epstein died an hour ago from hanging, cardiac arrest. Screencap this.”

The post came 38 minutes before ABC News broke the news of Epstein’s death at 8:54 a.m. on Saturday, according to BuzzFeed.

When other 4chan users were skeptical about the initial claims, the poster reportedly added further information, including the procedures used in the attempts to revive Epstein — details that have not yet been made public.

Dwyer told BuzzFeed that he “could not verify the accuracy” of the post and that the fire department would review the matter. He noted that any disclosure of medical information without consent would constitute a violation of privacy laws.

The New York City Medical Examiner’s Office declined to comment to The Hill about the reported review.

Oren Barzilay, president of the union for EMT workers Local 2507 in New York, told BuzzFeed that "our members do not release this type of confidential information, this looks like a 3rd party info.”

If there is a claim of a confidential breach, Barzilay said, the union will investigate it.

“There's serious consequences for those violations. Discipline. Suspensions. Civil penalties, etc,” he told the news outlet.

– This story was updated at 2:10 p.m. to reflect BuzzFeed's corrected story and to include comment from the NYFD