Zuckerberg: Facebook's 'new approach' is 'going to piss off a lot of people'

Facebook founder and CEO Mark ZuckerbergMark Elliot ZuckerbergDorsey defends decision to fact check Trump tweet: 'More transparency from us is critical' Zuckerberg: 'Facebook shouldn't be the arbiter of truth of everything that people say online' Hillicon Valley: Tech companies lead way on WFH forever | States and counties plead for cybersecurity assistance | Trump weighing anti-conservative bias panel MORE said that the social media giant will continue to support free expression and encrypted content on its platform in a new interview. 

"This is the new approach, and I think it's going to piss off a lot of people. But frankly, the old approach was pissing off a lot of people too, so let's try something different," Zuckerberg said Friday at the Silicon Slopes Tech Summit in Utah, CNN reported.

"Increasingly we're getting called to censor a lot of different kinds of content that makes me really uncomfortable," Zuckerberg continued.

ADVERTISEMENT

Zuckerberg said the company's previous goal was not to do anything "too offensive," but that approach is set to change for the global platform. Zuckerberg claimed that Facebook has previously faced excessive censorship, CNN reported.

However, he added that Facebook does have a responsibility to remove content on terrorism, child exploitation and messages, posts or other media that could incite violence.

"We're going to take down the content that's really harmful, but the line needs to be held at some point," Zuckerberg said, CNN reported.

Facebook drew backlash last year over its policy not to remove political advertisements that contain misinformation, defending the policy as free speech. Zuckerberg has previously said that, “It's really important that people can see for themselves what politicians are saying, so they can make their own judgments.” 

Zuckerberg also vowed that Facebook will continue pushing for encryption for its messaging services, which could prevent law enforcement, the U.S. government and Facebook itself from accessing communications between users.

"If you're not out there standing for things that people care about then it's not possible for people to feel that strongly about what you're doing," Zuckerberg said Friday, according to CNN.